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Article

Scaling up Microbial Fuel Cells for Treating Swine Wastewater

by 1,2 and 3,*
1
Division of Experimental, Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Organization of Occupational Health and Safety, Hadano, Kanagawa 257–0015, Japan
2
Department of Biomedical Science, Chubu University, Kasugai, Aichi 487–8501, Japan
3
Department of Civil Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Aichi 466–8555, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(9), 1803; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091803
Received: 23 July 2019 / Revised: 24 August 2019 / Accepted: 26 August 2019 / Published: 29 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Water and Wastewater Monitoring and Treatment Technology)
Conventional aerobic treatment of swine wastewater, which generally contains 4500–8200 mg L−1 of organic matter, is energy-consuming. The aim of this study was to assess the application of scaled-up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with different capacities (i.e., 1.5 L, 12 L, and 100 L) for removing organic matter from swine wastewater. The MFCs were single-chambered, consisting of an anode of microbially reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and an air-cathode of platinum-coated carbon cloth. The MFCs were polarized via an external resistance of 3–10 Ω for 40 days for the 1.5 L-MFC and 120 days for the 12L- and 100 L-MFC. The MFCs were operated in continuous flow mode (hydraulic retention time: 3–5 days). The 100 L-MFC achieved an average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 52%, which corresponded to a COD removal rate of 530 mg L−1 d−1. Moreover, the 100 L-MFC showed an average and maximum electricity generation of 0.6 and 2.2 Wh m−3, respectively. Our findings suggest that MFCs can effectively be used for swine wastewater treatment coupled with the simultaneous generation of electricity. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbial fuel cells; swine wastewater; graphene oxide microbial fuel cells; swine wastewater; graphene oxide
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goto, Y.; Yoshida, N. Scaling up Microbial Fuel Cells for Treating Swine Wastewater. Water 2019, 11, 1803. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091803

AMA Style

Goto Y, Yoshida N. Scaling up Microbial Fuel Cells for Treating Swine Wastewater. Water. 2019; 11(9):1803. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091803

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goto, Yuko, and Naoko Yoshida. 2019. "Scaling up Microbial Fuel Cells for Treating Swine Wastewater" Water 11, no. 9: 1803. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091803

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