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Monitoring Opportunistic Pathogens in Domestic Wastewater from a Pilot-Scale Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor to Reuse in Agricultural Irrigation

1
Farmland Irrigation Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Xinxiang 453002, China
2
Key Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(6), 1283; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061283
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 21 May 2019 / Accepted: 24 May 2019 / Published: 20 June 2019
Wastewater reuse for agricultural irrigation in many developing countries is an increasingly common practice. Regular monitoring of indicators can help to identify potential health risks; therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the presence and abundance of opportunistic pathogens in wastewater, as well as plant phyllosphere and rhizosphere. In this study, an anaerobic biofilm reactor (ABR) was developed to treat rural domestic wastewater; the performance of pollutants removal and pathogenic bacteria elimination were investigated. Additionally, we also assessed the physicochemical and microbiological profiles of soil and lettuces after wastewater irrigation. Aeromonas hydrophila, Arcobacter sp., Bacillus cereus, Bacteroides sp., Escherichia coli, Legionella sp., and Mycobacterium sp. were monitored in the irrigation water, as well as in the phyllosphere and rhizosphere of lettuces. Pathogens like B. cereus, Legionella sp. and Mycobacterium sp. were present in treated effluent with relatively high concentrations, and the levels of A. hydrophila, Arcobacter sp., and E. coli were higher in the phyllosphere. The physicochemical properties of soil and lettuce did not vary significantly. These data indicated that treated wastewater irrigation across a short time period may not alter the soil and crop properties, while the pathogens present in the wastewater may transfer to soil and plant, posing risks to human health. View Full-Text
Keywords: domestic wastewater; bacterial pathogens; qPCR; agricultural reuse domestic wastewater; bacterial pathogens; qPCR; agricultural reuse
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Cui, B.; Liang, S. Monitoring Opportunistic Pathogens in Domestic Wastewater from a Pilot-Scale Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor to Reuse in Agricultural Irrigation. Water 2019, 11, 1283.

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