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Open AccessArticle

Birch Bog on Anthropogenically Transformed Raised Bogs. A Case Study from Pomerania (Poland)

1
Department of Botany and Natural Conservation, Faculty of Biology, University of Szczecin, Felczaka 3c, PL-71-412 Szczecin, Poland
2
Department of Soil Science, Grassland and Environmental Chemistry, West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Słowackiego 17, PL-71-434 Szczecin, Poland
3
Department of Ecology, Environmental Protection and Management, West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Słowackiego 17, PL-71-434 Szczecin, Poland
4
Department of Chemistry, Microbiology and Environmental Biotechnology, West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Słowackiego 17, PL-71-434 Szczecin, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(6), 1224; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061224
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 1 May 2019 / Accepted: 31 May 2019 / Published: 12 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Hydrology)
Birch bog is formed on the margins of or within raised bogs, on secondary habitats. The study aim was to understand the vegetation and mycological diversity of birch bog on the background of habitat conditions on raised bogs subject to anthropogenic changes, including 15 areas located on seven bogs. Two of the analyzed areas were located on a peat bog not subject to human impact. Phytosociological and mycosociological relevés were taken and substrate analyses were carried out (pH, humidity, N-NH4, N-NO2, N-NO3 and P-PO4). Based on habitat predictors, two area groups were distinguished, differing primarily in humidity. More humid habitats were present on the margins of bogs, and were characterized by lower acidity and higher N-NH4 and P-PO4 abundance. Despite the fact they were enriched by runoffs from the neighboring arable fields, this was not always reflected in the plant and fungi species richness. Quercus robur appeared on less humid habitats, which may be a symptom of unfavorable changes toward habitat drying. In the majority of cases, changes in the habitat independent of the birch patches located and the human impact type are not yet reflected in the vegetation. However, they may be indicated by the fungal diversity, highest in former peat extraction pits, and lowest in pristine peat. View Full-Text
Keywords: Vaccinio uliginosi-Betuletum pubescentis; peat bog plants; macrofungi; former peat extraction pits; Betula pubescens; habitat predictors Vaccinio uliginosi-Betuletum pubescentis; peat bog plants; macrofungi; former peat extraction pits; Betula pubescens; habitat predictors
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Sotek, Z.; Stasińska, M.; Malinowski, R.; Gamrat, R.; Gałczyńska, M. Birch Bog on Anthropogenically Transformed Raised Bogs. A Case Study from Pomerania (Poland). Water 2019, 11, 1224.

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