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Water 2019, 11(4), 768; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040768

Olive Mill Wastewater: From a Pollutant to Green Fuels, Agricultural Water Source, and Bio-Fertilizer. Part 2: Water Recovery

1
CNRS ISM2 UMR 7361, Université de Haute Alsace, Université de Strasbourg, 68093 Mulhouse, France
2
National School of Engineers of Carthage, 45 rue des entrepreneurs, Charguia 2–1002, 2035 Tunis, Tunisia
3
CNRS, LIMA UMR 7042, Université de Haute-Alsace, Université de Strasbourg, 68093 Mulhouse, France
4
LVBE, EA 3991, Université de Haute-Alsace, 68008 Colmar, France
5
Wastewaters and Environment Laboratory, Water research and Technologies Centre, 8020 Soliman, Tunisia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 March 2019 / Revised: 9 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 13 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wastewater Treatment, Valorization and Reuse)
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Abstract

Water shortage is a very concerning issue in the Mediterranean region, menacing the viability of the agriculture sector and in some countries, population wellbeing. At the same time, liquid effluent volumes generated from agro-food industries in general and olive oil industry in particular, are quite huge. Thus, the main aim of this work is to suggest a sustainable solution for the management of olive mill wastewaters (OMWW) with possible reuse in irrigation. This work is a part of a series of papers valorizing all the outputs of a three-phase system of oil mills. It deals with recovery, by condensation, of water from both OMWW and OMWW-impregnated biomasses (sawdust and wood chips), during a convective drying operation (air velocity: 1 m/s and air temperature: 50 °C). The experimental results showed that the water yield recovery reaches about 95%. The condensate waters have low electrical conductivity and salinities but also acidic pH values and slightly high chemical oxygen demand (COD) values. However, they could be returned suitable for reuse in agriculture after additional low-cost treatment. View Full-Text
Keywords: OMWW; drying; water recovery; water characterization; sustainable development OMWW; drying; water recovery; water characterization; sustainable development
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Dutournié, P.; Jeguirim, M.; Khiari, B.; Goddard, M.-L.; Jellali, S. Olive Mill Wastewater: From a Pollutant to Green Fuels, Agricultural Water Source, and Bio-Fertilizer. Part 2: Water Recovery. Water 2019, 11, 768.

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