Next Article in Journal
Significance of Chlorinated Phenols Adsorption on Plastics and Bioplastics during Water Treatment
Previous Article in Journal
Role of Design and Operational Factors in the Removal of Pharmaceuticals by Constructed Wetlands
Open AccessArticle

Interactive Effect of Meteorological Drought and Vegetation Types on Root Zone Soil Moisture and Runoff in Rangeland Watersheds

1
Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Environment, Tianjin Normal University, No. 393 Binshuixi Road, Xiqing District, Tianjin 300387, China
2
College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632, China
3
School of Geographic and Environmental Sciences, Tianjin Normal University, No. 393 Binshuixi Road, Xiqing District, Tianjin 300387, China
4
Department of Environmental Sciences, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129, USA
5
Tianjin Key Laboratory of Wireless Mobile Communications and PowerTransmission, Tianjin Normal University, No. 393 Binshuixi Road, Xiqing District, Tianjin 300387, China
6
Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(11), 2357; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11112357
Received: 22 September 2019 / Revised: 7 November 2019 / Accepted: 7 November 2019 / Published: 10 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Hydrology)
The meteorological droughts in the climate transition zone of the Great Plains of the USA are projected to intensify, potentially leading to major shifts in water provisioning services in rangelands. To understand how meteorological drought interacts with vegetation to regulate runoff response, we collected precipitation, root zone soil moisture, and runoff data from experimental grassland and juniper (Juniperus virginiana L., redcedar) woodland watersheds for five years encompassing a drought year to pluvial year cycle. We contrasted the frequency distribution of precipitation intensities and applied wavelet analysis to reveal the coherence between precipitation and root zone soil moisture patterns. Compared with grassland, the root zone soil moisture in woodland had a narrower range, with the peak frequency skewed to a lower soil moisture content. The conversion of herbaceous vegetation to evergreen juniper woodland results in a delayed response of runoff to precipitation due to reduced antecedent soil moisture. The reduction of streamflow from the woodland watershed was greater in the normal and pluvial years than in the drought year. Thus, conversion from grassland to evergreen woody vegetation prolongs the impact of meteorological drought on soil moisture and streamflow. Restoring prairie that is heavily encroached by woody species may serve as an adaptive measure to mitigate the climate change impact on water resources and other ecosystem services provided by rangeland. View Full-Text
Keywords: meteorological drought; soil moisture; runoff; vegetation transition; wavelet analysis meteorological drought; soil moisture; runoff; vegetation transition; wavelet analysis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hao, Y.; Liu, Q.; Li, C.; Kharel, G.; An, L.; Stebler, E.; Zhong, Y.; Zou, C.B. Interactive Effect of Meteorological Drought and Vegetation Types on Root Zone Soil Moisture and Runoff in Rangeland Watersheds. Water 2019, 11, 2357.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop