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From Land to Sea, a Review of Hypertemporal Remote Sensing Advances to Support Ocean Surface Science

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Department of Geography, and Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, T12K8AF Cork, Ireland
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Department of Geography, University College Cork, T12K8AF Cork, Ireland
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School of Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences, and MaREI Centre Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, T12K8AF Cork, Ireland
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Oceanographic Services, OSIS, Marine Institute, Rinville, H91 R673 Oranmore, Ireland
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Department of Natural Resources, Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation, University of Twente, 7514 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(11), 2286; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11112286
Received: 19 September 2019 / Revised: 22 October 2019 / Accepted: 28 October 2019 / Published: 31 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Remote Sensing to Marine Fisheries and Oceanography)
Increases in the temporal frequency of satellite-derived imagery mean a greater diversity of ocean surface features can be studied, modelled, and understood. The ongoing temporal data “explosion” is a valuable resource, having prompted the development of adapted and new methodologies to extract information from hypertemporal datasets. Current suitable methodologies for use in hypertemporal ocean surface studies include using pixel-centred measurement analyses (PMA), classification analyses (CLS), and principal components analyses (PCA). These require limited prior knowledge of the system being measured. Time-series analyses (TSA) are also promising, though they require more expert knowledge which may be unavailable. Full use of this resource by ocean and fisheries researchers is restrained by limitations in knowledge on the regional to sub-regional spatiotemporal characteristics of the ocean surface. To lay the foundations for more expert, knowledge-driven research, temporal signatures and temporal baselines need to be identified and quantified in large datasets. There is an opportunity for data-driven hypertemporal methodologies. This review examines nearly 25 years of advances in exploratory hypertemporal research, and how methodologies developed for terrestrial research should be adapted when tasked towards ocean applications. It highlights research gaps which impede methodology transfer, and suggests achievable research areas to be addressed as short-term priorities. View Full-Text
Keywords: hypertemporal; Earth Observation data; remote sensing; methodologies; oceanography hypertemporal; Earth Observation data; remote sensing; methodologies; oceanography
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Scarrott, R.G.; Cawkwell, F.; Jessopp, M.; O’Rourke, E.; Cusack, C.; de Bie, K. From Land to Sea, a Review of Hypertemporal Remote Sensing Advances to Support Ocean Surface Science. Water 2019, 11, 2286.

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