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Water 2019, 11(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010018

The AquaNES Project: Coupling Riverbank Filtration and Ultrafiltration in Drinking Water Treatment

1
DREWAG NETZ GmbH, 01067 Dresden, Germany
2
Dresden University of Applied Sciences, 01069 Dresden, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 November 2018 / Revised: 7 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 21 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficiency of Bank Filtration and Post-Treatment)
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Abstract

Natural water treatment techniques combined with engineered solutions were investigated at demonstration sites in Europe within the AquaNES project. Ultrafiltration is well-established in water treatment, but is not feasible for many water utilities due to its high operational costs compared to conventional treatment. These differences in cost are caused by membrane fouling and the associated cleaning required. This study aims to assess the economic and energetic operation factors based on studies of an out/in ultrafiltration treatment plant for river water and bank filtrate. The fouling potential of both raw water sources was investigated as well as the quality of the resulting water. In addition, the results show the potential utility of a combined approach utilizing bank filtration followed by ultrafiltration in drinking water treatment. In a separate consideration of the treatment process, the water quality does not fulfill the requirements of the German drinking water ordinance. A new method for the removal of dissolved manganese from the bank filtrate is presented by inline electrolysis. While this improves water quality, this also has a significant influence on fouling potential and, thus, on operating costs of ultrafiltration. These aspects lead to a fundamental decision for operators to choose between more costly ultrafiltration with enhanced microbiological safety compared to cost-effective but less stringent drinking water treatment via open filtration. View Full-Text
Keywords: river bank filtration; ultrafiltration; surface water treatment; energy efficiency; out/in membrane comparison; inline electrolysis river bank filtration; ultrafiltration; surface water treatment; energy efficiency; out/in membrane comparison; inline electrolysis
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Haas, R.; Opitz, R.; Grischek, T.; Otter, P. The AquaNES Project: Coupling Riverbank Filtration and Ultrafiltration in Drinking Water Treatment. Water 2019, 11, 18.

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