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Article

Capillary Nanofiltration under Anoxic Conditions as Post-Treatment after Bank Filtration

1
Kompetenzzentrum Wasser Berlin (KWB), Cicerostraße 24, 10709 Berlin, Germany
2
Pentair X-Flow, Marssteden 50, 7547 TC Enschede, The Netherlands
3
Berliner Wasserbetriebe (BWB), Cicerostraße 24, 10709 Berlin, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2018, 10(11), 1599; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111599
Received: 28 September 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 1 November 2018 / Published: 7 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficiency of Bank Filtration and Post-Treatment)
Bank filtration schemes for the production of drinking water are increasingly affected by constituents such as sulphate and organic micropollutants (OMP) in the source water. Within the European project AquaNES, the combination of bank filtration followed by capillary nanofiltration (capNF) is being demonstrated as a potential solution for these challenges at pilot scale. As the bank filtration process reliably reduces total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biopolymers, algae and particles, membrane fouling is reduced resulting in long term operational stability of capNF systems. Iron and manganese fouling could be reduced with the possibility of anoxic operation of capNF. With the newly developed membrane module HF-TNF a good retention of sulphate (67–71%), selected micropollutants (e.g., EDTA: 84–92%) and hardness (41–55%) was achieved together with further removal of DOC (82–87%). Fouling and scaling could be handled with a good cleaning concept with acid and caustic. With the combination of bank filtration and capNF a possibility for treatment of anoxic well water without further pre-treatment was demonstrated and retention of selected current water pollutants was shown. View Full-Text
Keywords: decentralized capillary nanofiltration; anoxic; suboxic; organic micropollutants; bank filtrate; groundwater; sulphate decentralized capillary nanofiltration; anoxic; suboxic; organic micropollutants; bank filtrate; groundwater; sulphate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jährig, J.; Vredenbregt, L.; Wicke, D.; Miehe, U.; Sperlich, A. Capillary Nanofiltration under Anoxic Conditions as Post-Treatment after Bank Filtration. Water 2018, 10, 1599. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111599

AMA Style

Jährig J, Vredenbregt L, Wicke D, Miehe U, Sperlich A. Capillary Nanofiltration under Anoxic Conditions as Post-Treatment after Bank Filtration. Water. 2018; 10(11):1599. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111599

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jährig, Jeannette, Leo Vredenbregt, Daniel Wicke, Ulf Miehe, and Alexander Sperlich. 2018. "Capillary Nanofiltration under Anoxic Conditions as Post-Treatment after Bank Filtration" Water 10, no. 11: 1599. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111599

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