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Atmosphere 2018, 9(12), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9120480

Combination of Warming and Vegetation Composition Change Strengthens the Environmental Controls on N2O Fluxes in a Boreal Peatland

1,2
,
1,2,* , 1,2
,
1,2
and
1
1
Environment and Sustainability, School of Science and the Environment, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Corner Brook, NL A2H 5G4, Canada
2
Graduate Program in Environmental Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, A1C 5S7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 October 2018 / Revised: 29 November 2018 / Accepted: 4 December 2018 / Published: 6 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface-Atmosphere Exchange: Impact on Biogeochemistry)
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Abstract

Climate warming and vegetation composition change are expected to influence greenhouse gas emissions from boreal peatlands. However, the interactive effects of warming and different vegetation compositions on N2O dynamics are poorly known, although N2O is a very potent greenhouse gas. In this study, manipulated warming and vegetation composition change were conducted in a boreal peatland to investigate the effects on N2O fluxes during the growing seasons in 2015 and 2016. We did not find a significant effect of warming treatment and combination treatments of warming and vegetation composition change on N2O fluxes. However, sedge removal treatment significantly increased N2O emissions by three-fold. Compared with the treatment of shrub and sedge removal, the combined treatment of warming and shrub and sedge removal significantly increased N2O consumption by five-fold. Similar to N2O fluxes, the cumulative N2O flux increased by ~3.5 times under sedge removal treatment, but this effect was not significant. In addition, the results showed that total soil nitrogen was the main control for N2O fluxes under combinative treatments of warming and sedge/shrub removal, while soil temperature and dissolved organic carbon were the main controls for N2O release under warming combined with the removal of all vascular plants. Our results indicate that boreal peatlands have a negligible effect on N2O fluxes in the short-term under climate change, and environmental controls on N2O fluxes become increasingly important under the condition of warming and vegetation composition change. View Full-Text
Keywords: boreal peatlands; warming; plant functional type; nitrous oxide; total nitrogen; dissolved organic carbon boreal peatlands; warming; plant functional type; nitrous oxide; total nitrogen; dissolved organic carbon
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Gong, Y.; Wu, J.; Vogt, J.; Le, T.B.; Yuan, T. Combination of Warming and Vegetation Composition Change Strengthens the Environmental Controls on N2O Fluxes in a Boreal Peatland. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 480.

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