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Atmosphere 2018, 9(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9010030

A Two-Year Study on Mercury Fluxes from the Soil under Different Vegetation Cover in a Subtropical Region, South China

1,2
,
1,3
,
1,4
and
1,3,*
1
College of Resources and Environment, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
2
School of Environment, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China
3
Chongqing Key Laboratory of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Chongqing 400715, China
4
Research Center of Bioenergy and Bioremediation, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 October 2017 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 19 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Metal Pollution)
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Abstract

In order to reveal the mercury (Hg) emission and exchange characteristics at the soil–air interface under different vegetation cover types, the evergreen broad-leaf forest, shrub forest, grass, and bare lands of Simian Mountain National Nature Reserve were selected as the sampling sites. The gaseous elementary mercury (GEM) fluxes at the soil–air interface under the four vegetation covers were continuously monitored for two years, and the effect of temperature and solar radiation on GEM fluxes were also investigated. Results showed that the GEM fluxes at the soil–air interface under different vegetation cover types had significant difference (p < 0.05). The bare land had the maximum GEM flux (15.32 ± 10.44 ng·m−2·h−1), followed by grass land (14.73 ± 18.84 ng·m−2·h−1), and shrub forest (12.83 ± 10.22 ng·m−2·h−1), and the evergreen broad-leaf forest had the lowest value (11.23 ± 11.13 ng·m−2·h−1). The GEM fluxes at the soil–air interface under different vegetation cover types showed similar regularity in seasonal variation, which mean that the GEM fluxes in summer were higher than that in winter. In addition, the GEM fluxes at the soil–air interface under the four vegetation covers in Mt. Simian had obvious diurnal variations. View Full-Text
Keywords: dynamic flux chamber; mercury flux; soil–air interface; mercury deposition; vegetation dynamic flux chamber; mercury flux; soil–air interface; mercury deposition; vegetation
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Ma, M.; Sun, T.; Du, H.; Wang, D. A Two-Year Study on Mercury Fluxes from the Soil under Different Vegetation Cover in a Subtropical Region, South China. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 30.

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