Next Article in Journal
The Air-Sea Nitrous Oxide Flux along Cruise Tracks to the Arctic Ocean and Southern Ocean
Next Article in Special Issue
The Multi-Wavelength Absorption Analyzer (MWAA) Model as a Tool for Source and Component Apportionment Based on Aerosol Absorption Properties: Application to Samples Collected in Different Environments
Previous Article in Journal
Regional Impact Assessment of Monsoon Variability on Wind Power Availability and Optimization in Asia
Previous Article in Special Issue
On the Redox Activity of Urban Aerosol Particles: Implications for Size Distribution and Relationships with Organic Aerosol Components
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Atmosphere 2017, 8(11), 217; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos8110217

Evolution of Multispectral Aerosol Absorption Properties in a Biogenically-Influenced Urban Environment during the CARES Campaign

1
Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno, NV 89557, USA
2
Laboratory for Aerosol Science, Spectroscopy, and Optics, Desert Research Institute, Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno, NV 89512, USA
3
Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA
4
Earth System Observations, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
5
Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
6
Atmospheric Science Program, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
7
Droplet Measurements Technologies, Boulder, CO 80301, USA
Now at San Jacinto College, Houston, TX 77089, USA.
Now at RAI Innovations Company, Winston-Salem, NC 27105, USA.
§
Now at AECOM, Houston, TX 77094, USA.
Now at Laboratory for Advanced Analytical Technologies, Empa (Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology), Dübendorf 8600, Switzerland.
Now at Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354, USA.
**
Now at Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 October 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 13 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbonaceous Aerosols in Atmosphere)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1798 KB, uploaded 16 November 2017]   |  

Abstract

We present the evolution of multispectral optical properties through urban aerosols that have aged and interacted with biogenic emissions, resulting in stronger short wavelength absorption and the formation of moderately brown secondary organic aerosols. Ground-based aerosol measurements were made in June 2010 within the Sacramento urban area (site T0) and at a 40-km downwind location (site T1) in the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Data on black carbon (BC) and non-refractory aerosol mass and composition were collected at both sites. In addition, photoacoustic (PA) instruments with integrating nephelometers were used to measure spectral absorption and scattering coefficients for wavelengths ranging from 355 to 870 nm. The daytime absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) indicated a modest wavelength-dependent enhancement of absorption at both sites throughout the study. From 22 to 28 June 2010, secondary organic aerosol mass increased significantly at both sites, which was due to increased biogenic emissions coupled with intense photochemical activity and air mass recirculation in the area. During this period, the median BC mass-normalized absorption cross-section (MAC) values for 405 nm and 532 nm at T1 increased by ~23% and ~35%, respectively, compared with the relatively less aged urban emissions at the T0 site. In contrast, the average MAC values for the 870 nm wavelength were similar for both sites. These results suggest the formation of moderately brown secondary organic aerosols in biogenically-influenced urban air. View Full-Text
Keywords: aerosol optical properties; photoacoustic instruments; absorption Ångström exponent (AAE); mass absorption cross-section (MAC); secondary organic carbon (SOA); brown carbon (BrC); photochemical ageing; anthropogenic emissions; biogenic emissions aerosol optical properties; photoacoustic instruments; absorption Ångström exponent (AAE); mass absorption cross-section (MAC); secondary organic carbon (SOA); brown carbon (BrC); photochemical ageing; anthropogenic emissions; biogenic emissions
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W.P.; Zaveri, R.A.; Song, C.; Flowers, B.; Dubey, M.K.; Setyan, A.; Zhang, Q.; China, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Gorkowski, K.; Subramanian, R.; Moosmüller, H. Evolution of Multispectral Aerosol Absorption Properties in a Biogenically-Influenced Urban Environment during the CARES Campaign. Atmosphere 2017, 8, 217.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Atmosphere EISSN 2073-4433 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top