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Article

The Impact of Aerosols on Satellite Radiance Data Assimilation Using NCEP Global Data Assimilation System

1
Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12203, USA
2
Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, Boulder, CO 80301, USA
3
NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research, College Park, MD 20740, USA
4
I.M.Systems Group at NCEP/NWS/EMC, College Park, MD 20740, USA
5
I.M.Systems Group at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, College Park, MD 20740, USA
6
NOAA/NWS National Centers for Environmental Prediction, College Park, MD 20740, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Irina N. Sokolik
Atmosphere 2021, 12(4), 432; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040432
Received: 12 March 2021 / Revised: 24 March 2021 / Accepted: 24 March 2021 / Published: 28 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radiative Transfer in the Earth Atmosphere)
Aerosol radiative effects have been studied extensively by climate and weather research communities. However, aerosol impacts on radiance in the context of data assimilation (DA) have received little research attention. In this study, we investigated the aerosol impacts on the assimilation of satellite radiances by incorporating time-varying three-dimensional aerosol distributions into the radiance observation operator. A series of DA experiments was conducted for August 2017. We assessed the aerosol impacts on the simulated brightness temperatures (BTs), bias correction and quality control (QC) algorithms for the assimilated infrared sensors, and analyzed temperature fields. We found that taking the aerosols into account reduces simulated BT in thermal window channels (8 to 13 μm) by up to 4 K over dust-dominant regions. The cooler simulated BTs result in more positive first-guess departures, produce more negative biases, and alter the QC checks about 20%/40% of total/assimilated observations at the wavelength of 10.39 μm. As a result, assimilating aerosol-affected BTs produces a warmer analyzed lower atmosphere and sea surface temperature which have better agreement with measurements over the trans-Atlantic region. View Full-Text
Keywords: aerosols; data assimilation; satellite radiance; thermal infrared atmospheric window aerosols; data assimilation; satellite radiance; thermal infrared atmospheric window
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wei, S.-W.; Lu, C.-H.; Liu, Q.; Collard, A.; Zhu, T.; Grogan, D.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Grumbine, R.; Bhattacharjee, P.S. The Impact of Aerosols on Satellite Radiance Data Assimilation Using NCEP Global Data Assimilation System. Atmosphere 2021, 12, 432. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040432

AMA Style

Wei S-W, Lu C-H, Liu Q, Collard A, Zhu T, Grogan D, Li X, Wang J, Grumbine R, Bhattacharjee PS. The Impact of Aerosols on Satellite Radiance Data Assimilation Using NCEP Global Data Assimilation System. Atmosphere. 2021; 12(4):432. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040432

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wei, Shih-Wei, Cheng-Hsuan Lu, Quanhua Liu, Andrew Collard, Tong Zhu, Dustin Grogan, Xu Li, Jun Wang, Robert Grumbine, and Partha S. Bhattacharjee. 2021. "The Impact of Aerosols on Satellite Radiance Data Assimilation Using NCEP Global Data Assimilation System" Atmosphere 12, no. 4: 432. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040432

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