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Article

Calculation of NH3 Emissions, Evaluation of Backward Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Model and Aerodynamic Gradient Method

1
Air Quality Engineering, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark
2
School of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences HAFL, Bern University of Applied Sciences, 3052 Zollikofen, Switzerland
3
Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2021, 12(1), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12010102
Received: 10 December 2020 / Revised: 4 January 2021 / Accepted: 6 January 2021 / Published: 12 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Atmospheric Techniques, Instruments, and Modeling)
Two campaigns measuring ammonia (NH3) emissions with different measurement techniques were performed on a large grass field (26 ha) after the application of liquid animal manure. The aim was to compare emissions from a confined area estimated from either (i) concentration measurements, both point and line-integrated measurements, combined with backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) dispersion modeling or by (ii) estimation of the vertical flux by the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM) with and without footprint correction approximated by the bLS model estimates of the flux footprint. The objective of the comparison is to establish the best practice to derive NH3 emissions from a large field. NH3 emissions derived from bLS agreed well when comparing point and line-integrated measurements. Simple point measurements combined with bLS yield good emission estimations for the confined area. Without footprint correction, the AGM underestimates the emissions by up to 9% compared to the footprint-corrected AGM results. The sensitivity of the measurement methods makes it possible to quantify NH3 emissions with diurnal patterns even five days after a field application of liquid animal manure under wet conditions. The bLS model proves to be a strong tool to determine the NH3 emissions from point concentration measurements inside a large field after a slurry application. View Full-Text
Keywords: ammonia emission; backward Lagrangian stochastic model; micrometeorological techniques; differential optical absorption spectroscopy; cavity ring-down spectroscopy; grassland ammonia emission; backward Lagrangian stochastic model; micrometeorological techniques; differential optical absorption spectroscopy; cavity ring-down spectroscopy; grassland
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kamp, J.N.; Häni, C.; Nyord, T.; Feilberg, A.; Sørensen, L.L. Calculation of NH3 Emissions, Evaluation of Backward Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Model and Aerodynamic Gradient Method. Atmosphere 2021, 12, 102. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12010102

AMA Style

Kamp JN, Häni C, Nyord T, Feilberg A, Sørensen LL. Calculation of NH3 Emissions, Evaluation of Backward Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Model and Aerodynamic Gradient Method. Atmosphere. 2021; 12(1):102. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12010102

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kamp, Jesper N., Christoph Häni, Tavs Nyord, Anders Feilberg, and Lise L. Sørensen. 2021. "Calculation of NH3 Emissions, Evaluation of Backward Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Model and Aerodynamic Gradient Method" Atmosphere 12, no. 1: 102. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12010102

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