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Article

Updating Real-World Profiles of Volatile Organic Compounds and Their Reactivity Estimation in Tunnels of Mexico City

1
Basic Sciences, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Mexico City 02200, Mexico
2
Instituto Nacional de Ecología y Cambio Climático, Mexico City 14210, Mexico
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Comisión Ambiental de la Megalópolis, Mexico City 11320, Mexico
4
Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City 02202, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(12), 1339; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11121339
Received: 31 October 2020 / Revised: 27 November 2020 / Accepted: 2 December 2020 / Published: 9 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Air Quality)
The main objective of this work was to bring to date the exhaust and evaporative volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles from light-duty gasoline vehicles, carrying out a sampling and analysis campaign in two tunnels of Mexico City. The abundance of exhaust-emission VOC profiles was the same in 2018 as in 1998 (alkanes > aromatics > olefins > acetylene), albeit exhibiting large differences (67%, 17%, 12%, and 4% for 2018, and 50%, 26%, 16%, and 8% for 1998, respectively). An important reduction of 69% and 77% in VOC concentrations was registered inside and outside of the tunnel, respectively, in comparison with 1998. In the ambient air, alkanes accounted for 77%, since high concentrations of liquefied petroleum (LP) gas species are still present. Ethylene, propylene, 1-butene, and toluene from tunnel emissions contributed prominently to ozone formation, while the most reactive gasoline vapors were pentenes, pentanes, and butenes, although the ozone formation potential due to VOCs in tunnel emissions and ambient air also had a significant reduction. These results demonstrate that strategies carried out in the last 20 years were successful in achieving a better air quality, although the aromatic and olefin content in gasolines needs to be further reduced to lower the concentrations of toxic and reactive species. View Full-Text
Keywords: VOCs; tunnel; ozone; ozone formation potential; gasolines; VOC profiles VOCs; tunnel; ozone; ozone formation potential; gasolines; VOC profiles
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mugica-Álvarez, V.; Magaña-Reyes, M.; Martínez-Reyes, A.; Figueroa-Lara, J.; Blanco-Jiménez, S.; Goytia-Leal, V.; Páramo-Figueroa, V.H.; García-Martínez, R. Updating Real-World Profiles of Volatile Organic Compounds and Their Reactivity Estimation in Tunnels of Mexico City. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 1339. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11121339

AMA Style

Mugica-Álvarez V, Magaña-Reyes M, Martínez-Reyes A, Figueroa-Lara J, Blanco-Jiménez S, Goytia-Leal V, Páramo-Figueroa VH, García-Martínez R. Updating Real-World Profiles of Volatile Organic Compounds and Their Reactivity Estimation in Tunnels of Mexico City. Atmosphere. 2020; 11(12):1339. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11121339

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mugica-Álvarez, Violeta, Miguel Magaña-Reyes, Adriana Martínez-Reyes, Jesús Figueroa-Lara, Salvador Blanco-Jiménez, Valia Goytia-Leal, Victor H. Páramo-Figueroa, and Rocío García-Martínez. 2020. "Updating Real-World Profiles of Volatile Organic Compounds and Their Reactivity Estimation in Tunnels of Mexico City" Atmosphere 11, no. 12: 1339. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11121339

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