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Open AccessArticle

Carbonaceous Aerosols Collected at the Observatory of Monte Curcio in the Southern Mediterranean Basin

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Institute of Atmospheric Pollution of the National Research Council of Italy (IIA-CNR), Division of Rende, 87100 Cosenza, Italy
2
Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis of the National Research Council of Italy (IMAA-CNR), Tito Scalo, 85100 Potenza, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(10), 592; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10100592
Received: 1 August 2019 / Revised: 24 September 2019 / Accepted: 25 September 2019 / Published: 2 October 2019
This work provides the first continuous measurements of carbonaceous aerosol at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Monte Curcio regional station, within the southern Mediterranean basin. We specifically analyzed elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) concentrations in particulate matter (PM) samples, collected from April to December during the two years of 2016 and 2017. The purpose of the study is to understand the behavior of both PM and carbonaceous species, in their fine and coarse size fraction, along with their seasonal variability. Based on 18 months of observations, we obtained a dataset that resulted in a vast range of variability. We found the maximum values in summer, mainly related to the enhanced formation of secondary pollutants owing to intense solar radiation, also due to the high frequency of wildfires in the surrounding areas, as well as to the reduced precipitation and aerosol-wet removal. We otherwise observed the lowest levels during fall, coinciding with well-ventilated conditions, low photochemical activity, higher precipitation amounts, and less frequency of Saharan dust episodes. We employed the HYSPLIT model to identify long-range transport from Saharan desert. We found that the Saharan dust events caused higher concentrations of PM and OC in the coarser size fraction whereas the wildfire events likely influenced the highest PM, OC, and EC concentrations we recorded for the finer fraction. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbonaceous species; Mediterranean basin; wildfires; Saharan dust; seasonal variability carbonaceous species; Mediterranean basin; wildfires; Saharan dust; seasonal variability
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Bencardino, M.; Andreoli, V.; D’Amore, F.; Simone, F.D.; Mannarino, V.; Castagna, J.; Moretti, S.; Naccarato, A.; Sprovieri, F.; Pirrone, N. Carbonaceous Aerosols Collected at the Observatory of Monte Curcio in the Southern Mediterranean Basin. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 592.

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