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Article

Highly Conservative Pattern of Sex Chromosome Synapsis and Recombination in Neognathae Birds

1
Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia
2
Department of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia
3
Bird of Prey Rehabilitation Centre, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Frederic Veyrunes, Frederic Baudat and Jesús Page
Genes 2021, 12(9), 1358; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12091358
Received: 15 July 2021 / Revised: 16 August 2021 / Accepted: 27 August 2021 / Published: 29 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sex Chromosome Evolution and Meiosis)
We analyzed the synapsis and recombination between Z and W chromosomes in the oocytes of nine neognath species: domestic chicken Gallus gallus domesticus, grey goose Anser anser, black tern Chlidonias niger, common tern Sterna hirundo, pale martin Riparia diluta, barn swallow Hirundo rustica, European pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca, great tit Parus major and white wagtail Motacilla alba using immunolocalization of SYCP3, the main protein of the lateral elements of the synaptonemal complex, and MLH1, the mismatch repair protein marking mature recombination nodules. In all species examined, homologous synapsis occurs in a short region of variable size at the ends of Z and W chromosomes, where a single recombination nodule is located. The remaining parts of the sex chromosomes undergo synaptic adjustment and synapse non-homologously. In 25% of ZW bivalents of white wagtail, synapsis and recombination also occur at the secondary pairing region, which probably resulted from autosome−sex chromosome translocation. Using FISH with a paint probe specific to the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC) of the pale martin on the oocytes of the pale martin, barn swallow and great tit, we showed that both maternally inherited songbird chromosomes (GRC and W) share common sequences. View Full-Text
Keywords: avian sex chromosomes; recombination nodules; synaptonemal complex; MLH1; SYCP3; crossing over avian sex chromosomes; recombination nodules; synaptonemal complex; MLH1; SYCP3; crossing over
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MDPI and ACS Style

Torgasheva, A.; Malinovskaya, L.; Zadesenets, K.S.; Slobodchikova, A.; Shnaider, E.; Rubtsov, N.; Borodin, P. Highly Conservative Pattern of Sex Chromosome Synapsis and Recombination in Neognathae Birds. Genes 2021, 12, 1358. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12091358

AMA Style

Torgasheva A, Malinovskaya L, Zadesenets KS, Slobodchikova A, Shnaider E, Rubtsov N, Borodin P. Highly Conservative Pattern of Sex Chromosome Synapsis and Recombination in Neognathae Birds. Genes. 2021; 12(9):1358. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12091358

Chicago/Turabian Style

Torgasheva, Anna, Lyubov Malinovskaya, Kira S. Zadesenets, Anastasia Slobodchikova, Elena Shnaider, Nikolai Rubtsov, and Pavel Borodin. 2021. "Highly Conservative Pattern of Sex Chromosome Synapsis and Recombination in Neognathae Birds" Genes 12, no. 9: 1358. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12091358

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