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Review

Insect Behavioral Change and the Potential Contributions of Neuroinflammation—A Call for Future Research

by 1,2 and 1,2,3,*
1
Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16802, USA
2
Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16802, USA
3
Department of Biology, Eberly College of Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16802, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ioannis Eleftherianos
Genes 2021, 12(4), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12040465
Received: 23 February 2021 / Revised: 19 March 2021 / Accepted: 21 March 2021 / Published: 24 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evolutionary Genetics of Insect Innate Immunity)
Many organisms are able to elicit behavioral change in other organisms. Examples include different microbes (e.g., viruses and fungi), parasites (e.g., hairworms and trematodes), and parasitoid wasps. In most cases, the mechanisms underlying host behavioral change remain relatively unclear. There is a growing body of literature linking alterations in immune signaling with neuron health, communication, and function; however, there is a paucity of data detailing the effects of altered neuroimmune signaling on insect neuron function and how glial cells may contribute toward neuron dysregulation. It is important to consider the potential impacts of altered neuroimmune communication on host behavior and reflect on its potential role as an important tool in the “neuro-engineer” toolkit. In this review, we examine what is known about the relationships between the insect immune and nervous systems. We highlight organisms that are able to influence insect behavior and discuss possible mechanisms of behavioral manipulation, including potentially dysregulated neuroimmune communication. We close by identifying opportunities for integrating research in insect innate immunity, glial cell physiology, and neurobiology in the investigation of behavioral manipulation. View Full-Text
Keywords: behavioral manipulation; glia; insect innate immunity behavioral manipulation; glia; insect innate immunity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mangold, C.A.; Hughes, D.P. Insect Behavioral Change and the Potential Contributions of Neuroinflammation—A Call for Future Research. Genes 2021, 12, 465. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12040465

AMA Style

Mangold CA, Hughes DP. Insect Behavioral Change and the Potential Contributions of Neuroinflammation—A Call for Future Research. Genes. 2021; 12(4):465. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12040465

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mangold, Colleen A., and David P. Hughes. 2021. "Insect Behavioral Change and the Potential Contributions of Neuroinflammation—A Call for Future Research" Genes 12, no. 4: 465. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12040465

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