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Article

Cardiomyocyte Transplantation after Myocardial Infarction Alters the Immune Response in the Heart

1
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Rostock University Medical Centre, 18057 Rostock, Germany
2
Department of Life, Light and Matter, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock, Germany
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Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Rostock University Medical Centre, 18057 Rostock, Germany
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Department of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, Institute of Computer Science, University of Rostock, 18057 Rostock, Germany
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Department of Cardiology, Rostock University Medical Centre, 18057 Rostock, Germany
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Core Facility for Microarray Analysis, Institute for Immunology, Rostock University Medical Centre, 18057 Rostock, Germany
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Core Facility Multimodal Small Animal Imaging, Rostock University Medical Centre, 18057 Rostock, Germany
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Core Facility for Cell Sorting & Cell Analysis, Laboratory for Clinical Immunology, Rostock University Medical Centre, 18057 Rostock, Germany
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Rudolf-Zenker-Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Centre, 18057 Rostock, Germany
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Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock University Medical Centre, 18057 Rostock, Germany
11
Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study (STIAS), Wallenberg Research Centre at Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7602, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2020, 9(8), 1825; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9081825
Received: 14 June 2020 / Revised: 29 July 2020 / Accepted: 31 July 2020 / Published: 3 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cell-Immune Function and Cardiac Regeneration)
We investigated the influence of syngeneic cardiomyocyte transplantation after myocardial infarction (MI) on the immune response and cardiac function. Methods and Results: We show for the first time that the immune response is altered as a result of syngeneic neonatal cardiomyocyte transplantation after MI leading to improved cardiac pump function as observed by magnetic resonance imaging in C57BL/6J mice. Interestingly, there was no improvement in the capillary density as well as infarct area as observed by CD31 and Sirius Red staining, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a significantly different response of monocyte-derived macrophages and regulatory T cells after cell transplantation. Interestingly, the inhibition of monocyte infiltration accompanied by cardiomyocyte transplantation diminished the positive effect of cell transplantation alone. The number of CD68+ macrophages in the remote area of the heart observed after four weeks was also different between the groups. Transcriptome analysis showed several changes in the gene expression involving circadian regulation, mitochondrial metabolism and immune responses after cardiomyocyte transplantation. Conclusion: Our work shows that cardiomyocyte transplantation alters the immune response after myocardial infarction with the recruited monocytes playing a role in the beneficial effect of cell transplantation. It also paves the way for further optimization of the efficacy of cardiomyocyte transplantation and their successful translation in the clinic. View Full-Text
Keywords: infarction; cardiomyocytes; transplantation; immune response; translation infarction; cardiomyocytes; transplantation; immune response; translation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vasudevan, P.; Wolfien, M.; Lemcke, H.; Lang, C.I.; Skorska, A.; Gaebel, R.; Koczan, D.; Lindner, T.; Engelmann, R.; Vollmar, B.; Krause, B.J.; Wolkenhauer, O.; Lang, H.; Steinhoff, G.; David, R. Cardiomyocyte Transplantation after Myocardial Infarction Alters the Immune Response in the Heart. Cells 2020, 9, 1825. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9081825

AMA Style

Vasudevan P, Wolfien M, Lemcke H, Lang CI, Skorska A, Gaebel R, Koczan D, Lindner T, Engelmann R, Vollmar B, Krause BJ, Wolkenhauer O, Lang H, Steinhoff G, David R. Cardiomyocyte Transplantation after Myocardial Infarction Alters the Immune Response in the Heart. Cells. 2020; 9(8):1825. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9081825

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vasudevan, Praveen, Markus Wolfien, Heiko Lemcke, Cajetan I. Lang, Anna Skorska, Ralf Gaebel, Dirk Koczan, Tobias Lindner, Robby Engelmann, Brigitte Vollmar, Bernd J. Krause, Olaf Wolkenhauer, Hermann Lang, Gustav Steinhoff, and Robert David. 2020. "Cardiomyocyte Transplantation after Myocardial Infarction Alters the Immune Response in the Heart" Cells 9, no. 8: 1825. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9081825

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