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Open AccessArticle

3D Printed Conductive Nanocellulose Scaffolds for the Differentiation of Human Neuroblastoma Cells

1
Genomic and post-Genomic Center, IRCCS Mondino Foundation, Via Mondino 2, 27100 Pavia, Italy
2
3D Bioprinting Center, Chalmers University of Technology, Arvid Wallgrens backe 20, 41346 Göteborg, Sweden
3
Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Arvid Wallgrens backe 20, 41346 Göteborg, Sweden
4
Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 9, 41258 Göteborg, Sweden
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Department of Brain and Behavioural Sciences, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 6, 27100 Pavia, Italy
6
Laboratory of Neurobiology and Neurogenetic, Golgi-Cenci Foundation, Corso S. Martino 10, 20081 Abbiategrasso, Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2020, 9(3), 682; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030682
Received: 31 January 2020 / Revised: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 7 March 2020 / Published: 11 March 2020
We prepared cellulose nanofibrils-based (CNF), alginate-based and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)-based inks for freeform reversible embedding hydrogel (FRESH) 3D bioprinting of conductive scaffolds. The 3D printability of conductive inks was evaluated in terms of their rheological properties. The differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line) was visualized by the confocal microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy techniques. The expression of TUBB3 and Nestin genes was monitored by the RT-qPCR technique. We have demonstrated that the conductive guidelines promote the cell differentiation, regardless of using differentiation factors. It was also shown that the electrical conductivity of the 3D printed scaffolds could be tuned by calcium–induced crosslinking of alginate, and this plays a significant role on neural cell differentiation. Our work provides a protocol for the generation of a realistic in vitro 3D neural model and allows for a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D bioprinting; cellular models; conductive scaffold; carbon nanotubes; 3D cell cultures 3D bioprinting; cellular models; conductive scaffold; carbon nanotubes; 3D cell cultures
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bordoni, M.; Karabulut, E.; Kuzmenko, V.; Fantini, V.; Pansarasa, O.; Cereda, C.; Gatenholm, P. 3D Printed Conductive Nanocellulose Scaffolds for the Differentiation of Human Neuroblastoma Cells. Cells 2020, 9, 682. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030682

AMA Style

Bordoni M, Karabulut E, Kuzmenko V, Fantini V, Pansarasa O, Cereda C, Gatenholm P. 3D Printed Conductive Nanocellulose Scaffolds for the Differentiation of Human Neuroblastoma Cells. Cells. 2020; 9(3):682. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030682

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bordoni, Matteo; Karabulut, Erdem; Kuzmenko, Volodymyr; Fantini, Valentina; Pansarasa, Orietta; Cereda, Cristina; Gatenholm, Paul. 2020. "3D Printed Conductive Nanocellulose Scaffolds for the Differentiation of Human Neuroblastoma Cells" Cells 9, no. 3: 682. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030682

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