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Cellular Stress Responses in Radiotherapy

1
Department of Biology Education, Korea National University of Education, Cheongju-si, Chungbuk 28173, Korea
2
Department of Science Education, Korea National University of Education, Cheongju-si, Chungbuk 28173, Korea
3
Department of Integrated Biological Science, Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Korea
4
Laboratory of Low Dose Risk Assessment, National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812, Korea
5
Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biotechnology, Sejong University, Seoul 05006, Korea
6
Department of Biological Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Cells 2019, 8(9), 1105; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8091105
Received: 22 August 2019 / Revised: 11 September 2019 / Accepted: 18 September 2019 / Published: 18 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Stress Responses)
Radiotherapy is one of the major cancer treatment strategies. Exposure to penetrating radiation causes cellular stress, directly or indirectly, due to the generation of reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, and subcellular organelle damage and autophagy. These radiation-induced damage responses cooperatively contribute to cancer cell death, but paradoxically, radiotherapy also causes the activation of damage-repair and survival signaling to alleviate radiation-induced cytotoxic effects in a small percentage of cancer cells, and these activations are responsible for tumor radio-resistance. The present study describes the molecular mechanisms responsible for radiation-induced cellular stress response and radioresistance, and the therapeutic approaches used to overcome radioresistance. View Full-Text
Keywords: radiation response; radioresistance; reactive oxygen species; DNA damage response; lipid peroxidation; mitochondrial damage; ER stress; autophagy radiation response; radioresistance; reactive oxygen species; DNA damage response; lipid peroxidation; mitochondrial damage; ER stress; autophagy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, W.; Lee, S.; Seo, D.; Kim, D.; Kim, K.; Kim, E.; Kang, J.; Seong, K.M.; Youn, H.; Youn, B. Cellular Stress Responses in Radiotherapy. Cells 2019, 8, 1105. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8091105

AMA Style

Kim W, Lee S, Seo D, Kim D, Kim K, Kim E, Kang J, Seong KM, Youn H, Youn B. Cellular Stress Responses in Radiotherapy. Cells. 2019; 8(9):1105. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8091105

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Wanyeon, Sungmin Lee, Danbi Seo, Dain Kim, Kyeongmin Kim, EunGi Kim, JiHoon Kang, Ki Moon Seong, HyeSook Youn, and BuHyun Youn. 2019. "Cellular Stress Responses in Radiotherapy" Cells 8, no. 9: 1105. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8091105

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