Next Article in Journal
Regenerative Rehabilitation and Stem Cell Therapy Targeting Chronic Spinal Cord Injury: A Review of Preclinical Studies
Next Article in Special Issue
Stabilization of PIM Kinases in Hypoxia Is Mediated by the Deubiquitinase USP28
Previous Article in Journal
L-Thyroxine Improves Vestibular Compensation in a Rat Model of Acute Peripheral Vestibulopathy: Cellular and Behavioral Aspects
Previous Article in Special Issue
Treatment of Pheochromocytoma Cells with Recurrent Cycles of Hypoxia: A New Pseudohypoxic In Vitro Model
 
 
Review

Detection of Hypoxia in Cancer Models: Significance, Challenges, and Advances

by 1,2,3, 2, 2 and 1,2,3,4,*
1
The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
2
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
3
Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
4
Cellular and Molecular Medicine Program, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ana Clara Carrera
Cells 2022, 11(4), 686; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11040686
Received: 17 January 2022 / Revised: 7 February 2022 / Accepted: 9 February 2022 / Published: 16 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hypoxia and Cancer: Mechanisms of Resistance and Metastasis)
The rapid proliferation of cancer cells combined with deficient vessels cause regions of nutrient and O2 deprivation in solid tumors. Some cancer cells can adapt to these extreme hypoxic conditions and persist to promote cancer progression. Intratumoral hypoxia has been consistently associated with a worse patient prognosis. In vitro, 3D models of spheroids or organoids can recapitulate spontaneous O2 gradients in solid tumors. Likewise, in vivo murine models of cancer reproduce the physiological levels of hypoxia that have been measured in human tumors. Given the potential clinical importance of hypoxia in cancer progression, there is an increasing need to design methods to measure O2 concentrations. O2 levels can be directly measured with needle-type probes, both optical and electrochemical. Alternatively, indirect, noninvasive approaches have been optimized, and include immunolabeling endogenous or exogenous markers. Fluorescent, phosphorescent, and luminescent reporters have also been employed experimentally to provide dynamic measurements of O2 in live cells or tumors. In medical imaging, modalities such as MRI and PET are often the method of choice. This review provides a comparative overview of the main methods utilized to detect hypoxia in cell culture and preclinical models of cancer. View Full-Text
Keywords: hypoxia; detection; cancer; HIF hypoxia; detection; cancer; HIF
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Godet, I.; Doctorman, S.; Wu, F.; Gilkes, D.M. Detection of Hypoxia in Cancer Models: Significance, Challenges, and Advances. Cells 2022, 11, 686. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11040686

AMA Style

Godet I, Doctorman S, Wu F, Gilkes DM. Detection of Hypoxia in Cancer Models: Significance, Challenges, and Advances. Cells. 2022; 11(4):686. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11040686

Chicago/Turabian Style

Godet, Inês, Steven Doctorman, Fan Wu, and Daniele M. Gilkes. 2022. "Detection of Hypoxia in Cancer Models: Significance, Challenges, and Advances" Cells 11, no. 4: 686. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11040686

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop