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Review

Alterations of Mitochondrial Network by Cigarette Smoking and E-Cigarette Vaping

1
College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
2
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Geethanjali College of Pharmacy, Cherryal, Keesara, Medchalmalkajgiri District, Hyderabad 501301, India
3
Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
4
Department of Zoology, School of Life and Health Sciences, Adikavi Nannaya University, Rajahmundry 533296, India
5
Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Nadine Camougrand
Cells 2022, 11(10), 1688; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11101688
Received: 17 April 2022 / Revised: 13 May 2022 / Accepted: 16 May 2022 / Published: 19 May 2022
Toxins present in cigarette and e-cigarette smoke constitute a significant cause of illnesses and are known to have fatal health impacts. Specific mechanisms by which toxins present in smoke impair cell repair are still being researched and are of prime interest for developing more effective treatments. Current literature suggests toxins present in cigarette smoke and aerosolized e-vapor trigger abnormal intercellular responses, damage mitochondrial function, and consequently disrupt the homeostasis of the organelle’s biochemical processes by increasing reactive oxidative species. Increased oxidative stress sets off a cascade of molecular events, disrupting optimal mitochondrial morphology and homeostasis. Furthermore, smoking-induced oxidative stress may also amalgamate with other health factors to contribute to various pathophysiological processes. An increasing number of studies show that toxins may affect mitochondria even through exposure to secondhand or thirdhand smoke. This review assesses the impact of toxins present in tobacco smoke and e-vapor on mitochondrial health, networking, and critical structural processes, including mitochondria fission, fusion, hyper-fusion, fragmentation, and mitophagy. The efforts are focused on discussing current evidence linking toxins present in first, second, and thirdhand smoke to mitochondrial dysfunction. View Full-Text
Keywords: cigarette smoking; e-cigarette smoking; mitochondria; fusion; fission cigarette smoking; e-cigarette smoking; mitochondria; fusion; fission
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kanithi, M.; Junapudi, S.; Shah, S.I.; Matta Reddy, A.; Ullah, G.; Chidipi, B. Alterations of Mitochondrial Network by Cigarette Smoking and E-Cigarette Vaping. Cells 2022, 11, 1688. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11101688

AMA Style

Kanithi M, Junapudi S, Shah SI, Matta Reddy A, Ullah G, Chidipi B. Alterations of Mitochondrial Network by Cigarette Smoking and E-Cigarette Vaping. Cells. 2022; 11(10):1688. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11101688

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kanithi, Manasa, Sunil Junapudi, Syed Islamuddin Shah, Alavala Matta Reddy, Ghanim Ullah, and Bojjibabu Chidipi. 2022. "Alterations of Mitochondrial Network by Cigarette Smoking and E-Cigarette Vaping" Cells 11, no. 10: 1688. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11101688

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