Next Article in Journal
A Novel Therapeutic Target, BACH1, Regulates Cancer Metabolism
Next Article in Special Issue
Microglial Pruning: Relevance for Synaptic Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis and Related Experimental Models
Previous Article in Journal
Clinical, Pathological and Molecular Characteristics of Chilean Patients with Early-, Intermediate- and Late-Onset Colorectal Cancer
Previous Article in Special Issue
Oligodendrocyte Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Perspectives
Review

RNA Localization and Local Translation in Glia in Neurological and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Lessons from Neurons

1
Achucarro Basque Center for Neuroscience, 48940 Leioa, Spain
2
Departamento de Neurociencias, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), 48940 Leioa, Spain
3
Departamento de Biología Celular e Histología, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), 48940 Leioa, Spain
4
Centro de Investigación en Red de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), 48940 Leioa, Spain
5
IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48009 Bilbao, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Nadia D’Ambrosi
Cells 2021, 10(3), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10030632
Received: 27 January 2021 / Revised: 3 March 2021 / Accepted: 9 March 2021 / Published: 12 March 2021
Cell polarity is crucial for almost every cell in our body to establish distinct structural and functional domains. Polarized cells have an asymmetrical morphology and therefore their proteins need to be asymmetrically distributed to support their function. Subcellular protein distribution is typically achieved by localization peptides within the protein sequence. However, protein delivery to distinct cellular compartments can rely, not only on the transport of the protein itself but also on the transport of the mRNA that is then translated at target sites. This phenomenon is known as local protein synthesis. Local protein synthesis relies on the transport of mRNAs to subcellular domains and their translation to proteins at target sites by the also localized translation machinery. Neurons and glia specially depend upon the accurate subcellular distribution of their proteome to fulfil their polarized functions. In this sense, local protein synthesis has revealed itself as a crucial mechanism that regulates proper protein homeostasis in subcellular compartments. Thus, deregulation of mRNA transport and/or of localized translation can lead to neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Local translation has been more extensively studied in neurons than in glia. In this review article, we will summarize the state-of-the art research on local protein synthesis in neuronal function and dysfunction, and we will discuss the possibility that local translation in glia and deregulation thereof contributes to neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: mRNA transport and localization; local protein synthesis; neurons; neurites; glia; processes; neurological and neurodegenerative diseases mRNA transport and localization; local protein synthesis; neurons; neurites; glia; processes; neurological and neurodegenerative diseases
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Blanco-Urrejola, M.; Gaminde-Blasco, A.; Gamarra, M.; de la Cruz, A.; Vecino, E.; Alberdi, E.; Baleriola, J. RNA Localization and Local Translation in Glia in Neurological and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Lessons from Neurons. Cells 2021, 10, 632. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10030632

AMA Style

Blanco-Urrejola M, Gaminde-Blasco A, Gamarra M, de la Cruz A, Vecino E, Alberdi E, Baleriola J. RNA Localization and Local Translation in Glia in Neurological and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Lessons from Neurons. Cells. 2021; 10(3):632. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10030632

Chicago/Turabian Style

Blanco-Urrejola, Maite, Adhara Gaminde-Blasco, María Gamarra, Aida de la Cruz, Elena Vecino, Elena Alberdi, and Jimena Baleriola. 2021. "RNA Localization and Local Translation in Glia in Neurological and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Lessons from Neurons" Cells 10, no. 3: 632. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10030632

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop