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Review

Deciphering the Symbiotic Plant Microbiome: Translating the Most Recent Discoveries on Rhizobia for the Improvement of Agricultural Practices in Metal-Contaminated and High Saline Lands

1
Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry (DAGRI), University of Florence, 50144 Florence, Italy
2
Department of Biology, University of Florence, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
3
Department of Biology, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
4
Department of Agricultural and Food Science (DISTAL), University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(9), 529; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090529
Received: 1 July 2019 / Revised: 27 August 2019 / Accepted: 5 September 2019 / Published: 10 September 2019
Rhizosphere and plant-associated microorganisms have been intensely studied for their beneficial effects on plant growth and health. These mainly include nitrogen-fixing bacteria (NFB) and plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). This beneficial fraction is involved in major functions such as plant nutrition and plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, which include water deficiency and heavy-metal contamination. Consequently, crop yield emerges as the net result of the interactions between the plant genome and its associated microbiome. Here, we provide a review covering recent studies on PGP rhizobia as effective inoculants for agricultural practices in harsh soil, and we propose models for inoculant combinations and genomic manipulation strategies to improve crop yield. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil bioremediation; high-salinity soil; plant beneficial microbes; rhizobia; microbial inoculants; plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) soil bioremediation; high-salinity soil; plant beneficial microbes; rhizobia; microbial inoculants; plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bellabarba, A.; Fagorzi, C.; diCenzo, G.C.; Pini, F.; Viti, C.; Checcucci, A. Deciphering the Symbiotic Plant Microbiome: Translating the Most Recent Discoveries on Rhizobia for the Improvement of Agricultural Practices in Metal-Contaminated and High Saline Lands. Agronomy 2019, 9, 529. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090529

AMA Style

Bellabarba A, Fagorzi C, diCenzo GC, Pini F, Viti C, Checcucci A. Deciphering the Symbiotic Plant Microbiome: Translating the Most Recent Discoveries on Rhizobia for the Improvement of Agricultural Practices in Metal-Contaminated and High Saline Lands. Agronomy. 2019; 9(9):529. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090529

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bellabarba, Agnese, Camilla Fagorzi, George C. diCenzo, Francesco Pini, Carlo Viti, and Alice Checcucci. 2019. "Deciphering the Symbiotic Plant Microbiome: Translating the Most Recent Discoveries on Rhizobia for the Improvement of Agricultural Practices in Metal-Contaminated and High Saline Lands" Agronomy 9, no. 9: 529. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090529

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