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Open AccessArticle

Participatory Plant Breeding and the Evolution of Landraces: A Case Study in the Organic Farms of the Collserola Natural Park

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Miquel Agustí Foundation, Campus del Baix Llobregat, Carrer Esteve Terrades 8, Edifici D4, 08860 Castelldefels, Spain
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Department of Agri-Food Engineering and Biotechnology, BarcelonaTech, Campus del Baix Llobregat, Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Carrer Esteve Terrades 8, Edifici D4, 08860 Castelldefels, Spain
3
Integrative Crop Ecophysiology Group, Plant Physiology Section, Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(9), 486; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090486
Received: 29 July 2019 / Revised: 20 August 2019 / Accepted: 26 August 2019 / Published: 27 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Crop Breeding and Genetics)
Although consumers appreciate the genetic diversity among tomato landraces, traditional varieties have been displaced from commercial agriculture. Their cultivation through organic farming in natural parks can contribute to their resurgence. With this aim, we developed a participatory plant breeding (PPB) program in Collserola Natural Park (Barcelona, Spain) to promote the conservation of the Mando landrace and to obtain new varieties adapted to local organic farms. Taking advantage of the natural genetic variation from the variety’s high cross-pollination rate, farmers developed five experimental inbreeds that were tested in a multi-locality trial in 2018. As a result of the PPB program, cultivation of the original landrace increased from 80 plants in 2011 to more than 2000 plants in 2018, which protected the variety from genetic erosion. Locality was the factor that contributed mostly to agronomic traits (e.g., yield (66% of the phenotypic variance)), while the genotype contributed more to the quality traits (except for soluble solids (37%) and dry matter (38%)). Farmer evaluations were highly correlated with the phenotypic traits recorded by researchers (Pearson coefficient ranging from 0.63–0.83), and led to the same final varietal selection. The superior inbred selected (3.9) is now being cultivated in the area of study. This paper discusses the efficiency of PPB in guiding the evolution of landraces. View Full-Text
Keywords: tomato; Solanum lycopersicum L.; crop genetic resources; genetic erosion; farmer evaluation; yield stability; sensory analysis tomato; Solanum lycopersicum L.; crop genetic resources; genetic erosion; farmer evaluation; yield stability; sensory analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Casals, J.; Rull, A.; Segarra, J.; Schober, P.; Simó, J. Participatory Plant Breeding and the Evolution of Landraces: A Case Study in the Organic Farms of the Collserola Natural Park. Agronomy 2019, 9, 486. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090486

AMA Style

Casals J, Rull A, Segarra J, Schober P, Simó J. Participatory Plant Breeding and the Evolution of Landraces: A Case Study in the Organic Farms of the Collserola Natural Park. Agronomy. 2019; 9(9):486. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090486

Chicago/Turabian Style

Casals, Joan; Rull, Aurora; Segarra, Joel; Schober, Philipp; Simó, Joan. 2019. "Participatory Plant Breeding and the Evolution of Landraces: A Case Study in the Organic Farms of the Collserola Natural Park" Agronomy 9, no. 9: 486. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090486

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