Next Article in Journal
Grassland Management Influences the Response of Soil Respiration to Drought
Next Article in Special Issue
Multi-Year N and P Removal of a 10-Year-Old Surface Flow Constructed Wetland Treating Agricultural Drainage Waters
Previous Article in Journal
Ammonium Sorbed to Zeolite Is Partly Available to Wheat in the First Growth Cycle
Previous Article in Special Issue
Agronomic Basis and Strategies for Precision Water Management: A Review
Article Menu
Issue 3 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Roots of Lucerne Seedlings are More Resilient to a Water Deficit than Leaves or Stems

1
College of Forestry, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou 730070, China
2
UWA School of Agriculture and Environment, The University of Western Australia, Locked Bag 5005, Perth, WA 6001, Australia
3
UWA Institute of Agriculture, The University of Western Australia M082, Locked Bag 5005, Perth, WA 6001, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(3), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9030123
Received: 29 January 2019 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 25 February 2019 / Published: 7 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Water Management)
  |  
PDF [994 KB, uploaded 7 March 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Drought is one of the most harmful environmental stresses affecting the physiological, biochemical processes and growth of plants. Lucerne or alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), one of the most popular pasture species in arid and semi-arid regions, plays a critical role in sustaining agricultural systems in many areas of the world. In order to evaluate the effect of water shortage on water status, biomass distribution and proline content, the relative water content (RWC), biomass and proline concentration in the leaves, stems and roots of lucerne seedlings under three different water regimes were studied in pots under a rainout shelter. The results showed that after water was withheld, the RWC of the different organs decreased significantly; at the same soil water content, the leaf RWC was higher than that of the stem and root. The biomass of the leaves, stems and roots were all reduced by water stress, while the root–shoot ratio increased indicating that the roots were less affected than the leaves and stems. Proline concentration increased with decreasing soil water content with the leaf proline concentration increasing more than that of stems and roots. These results indicate that roots of lucerne seedlings show greater resilience to water deficits than shoots. View Full-Text
Keywords: Medicago sativa (L.); relative water content; biomass; proline concentration; root:shoot ratio; drought adaptation Medicago sativa (L.); relative water content; biomass; proline concentration; root:shoot ratio; drought adaptation
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Luo, Y.-Z.; Liu, H.; Yan, G.; Li, G.; Turner, N.C. Roots of Lucerne Seedlings are More Resilient to a Water Deficit than Leaves or Stems. Agronomy 2019, 9, 123.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Agronomy EISSN 2073-4395 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top