Next Article in Journal
Vineyard Variability Analysis through UAV-Based Vigour Maps to Assess Climate Change Impacts
Next Article in Special Issue
Breeding Strategies to Improve Miscanthus as a Sustainable Source of Biomass for Bioenergy and Biorenewable Products
Previous Article in Journal
Perennial Ryegrass Wear Resistance and Soil Amendment by Ca- and Mg-Silicates
Previous Article in Special Issue
Prospects for Measurement of Dry Matter Yield in Forage Breeding Programs Using Sensor Technologies
Article

Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for Forage Traits in Intermediate Wheatgrass When Grown as Spaced-Plants versus Monoculture and Polyculture Swards

1
Plants, Soils, and Climate Department, UMC 4820, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-4820, USA
2
USDA Agricultural Research Service, Forage and Range Research, UMC 6300, Logan, UT 84322-6300, USA
3
The Land Institute, 2440 E. Water Well Rd, Salina, KS 67401, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(10), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9100580
Received: 19 July 2019 / Revised: 9 September 2019 / Accepted: 17 September 2019 / Published: 25 September 2019
It has been hypothesized that the genetic control of forage traits, especially biomass, for grass plants growing as spaced-plants versus swards is different. Likewise, the genetic control of compatibility in grass–legume polyculture mixtures is assumed to be different than for forage production in a grass monoculture. However, these hypotheses are largely unvalidated, especially at the DNA level. This study used an intermediate wheatgrass mapping population to examine the effect of three competition environments (spaced-plants, polyculture, and monoculture) on classical quantitative genetic parameters and quantitative trait loci (QTL) identification for biomass, morphology, and forage nutritive value. Moderate to high heritable variation was observed for biomass, morphological traits, and nutritive value within all three environments (H ranged from 0.50 to 0.87). Genetic correlations (rG) among environments for morphology and nutritive value were predominantly high, however, were moderately-low (0.30 to 0.48) for biomass. Six biomass QTL were identified, including three on linkage groups (LG) 1, 6, and 15 that were only expressed in the monoculture environment. Moreover, three biomass QTL on LG 10, 14, and 15 exhibited significant QTL by environment interactions. This study verified that the genetic control of grass biomass in a monoculture versus a grass–legume mixture is only partially the same, with additional genes expressed in monoculture, and that biomass in widely spaced-plants versus swards is predominantly under different genetic control. These results indicate that selection for improved grass biomass will be most successful when conducted within the targeted monoculture or polyculture sward environment per se. View Full-Text
Keywords: forage mass; forage nutritive value; QTL; grass–legume mixtures forage mass; forage nutritive value; QTL; grass–legume mixtures
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mortenson, J.S.; Waldron, B.L.; Larson, S.R.; Jensen, K.B.; DeHaan, L.R.; Peel, M.D.; Johnson, P.G.; Creech, J.E. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for Forage Traits in Intermediate Wheatgrass When Grown as Spaced-Plants versus Monoculture and Polyculture Swards. Agronomy 2019, 9, 580. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9100580

AMA Style

Mortenson JS, Waldron BL, Larson SR, Jensen KB, DeHaan LR, Peel MD, Johnson PG, Creech JE. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for Forage Traits in Intermediate Wheatgrass When Grown as Spaced-Plants versus Monoculture and Polyculture Swards. Agronomy. 2019; 9(10):580. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9100580

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mortenson, John S., Blair L. Waldron, Steve R. Larson, Kevin B. Jensen, Lee R. DeHaan, Michael D. Peel, Paul G. Johnson, and J. E. Creech 2019. "Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for Forage Traits in Intermediate Wheatgrass When Grown as Spaced-Plants versus Monoculture and Polyculture Swards" Agronomy 9, no. 10: 580. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9100580

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop