Next Article in Journal
Early-Season Soil Waterlogging and N Fertilizer Sources Impacts on Corn N Uptake and Apparent N Recovery Efficiency
Previous Article in Journal
Compared to Australian Cultivars, European Summer Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Overreacts When Moderate Heat Stress Is Applied at the Pollen Development Stage
Open AccessArticle

Impacts of Trace Element Addition on Lentil (Lens culinaris L.) Agronomy

1
Department of Agronomy, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Gazipur P.O. Box 1706, Bangladesh
2
Department of Agricultural Engineering, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Gazipur P.O. Box 1706, Bangladesh
3
Department of Soil Science, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Gazipur P.O. Box 1706, Bangladesh
4
Department of Soil Science, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Gazipur P.O. Box 1701, Bangladesh
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2018, 8(7), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8070100
Received: 27 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 27 June 2018
Adequate supply of micronutrients is important for the proper growth and yield of lentil, particularly in poorly fertile soil. This study was carried out to understand the effects of zinc (Zn), boron (B), and molybdenum (Mo) on the growth and yield of lentil, and how these elements can help manage soil fertility issues. In this regard, the morpho-physiological traits of lentils (BARI Masur-7) were collected from two experiments receiving the same treatments carried out during consecutive rabi seasons of 2015–2016 and 2016–2017. The experiments were laid out with a randomized complete block design having eight treatments, and was replicated thrice. The treatments were T1 (Control), T2 (Zn2.0 kg ha−1), T3 (B1.5 kg ha−1), T4 (Mo1.0 kg ha−1), T5 (Zn2.0B1.5 kg ha−1), T6 (Zn2.0Mo1.0 kg ha−1), T7 (B1.5Mo1.0 kg ha−1), and T8 (Zn2.0B1.5Mo1.0 kg ha−1). The results revealed that the application of micronutrients either singly or in combination had significant effects on the plant height, number of branches per plant, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod, thousand seed weight, and the seed yield of lentil. The maximum seed production was, however, observed in plots receiving treatment T8, i.e., the combined application of Zn, B, and Mo. Agronomic biofortification also had significantly increased protein content of lentil seeds while affecting the macro and micronutrient content of lentil seed. These results suggest that any micronutrient deficiencies might lead to a yield loss of lentil, and such a scenario could be avoided by a combined application of micronutrients at a proportionate level. View Full-Text
Keywords: micronutrients; lentil; crop characteristics; yield component; seed quality; soil properties micronutrients; lentil; crop characteristics; yield component; seed quality; soil properties
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Islam, M.M.; Karim, M.R.; Oliver, M.M.H.; Urmi, T.A.; Hossain, M.A.; Haque, M.M. Impacts of Trace Element Addition on Lentil (Lens culinaris L.) Agronomy. Agronomy 2018, 8, 100.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop