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Article

Arable Podzols Are a Substantial Carbon Sink under Current and Future Climates: Evidence from a Long-Term Experiment in the Vladimir Region, Russia

1
Faculty of Soil Science, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow, Russia
2
Geographical Network Department, All-Russian Research Institute of Agrochemistry Named after D. Pryanishnikov, 127550 Moscow, Russia
3
Branch of Upper Volga Federal Agrarian Scientific Center, All-Russian Research Institute of Organic Fertilizers and Peat, 601390 Vyatkino, Russia
4
National Research Institute of Agricultural Meteorology, 249030 Obninsk, Russia
5
All-Russian Institute of Agrarian Problems and Informatics Named after A. Nikonov, 105064 Moscow, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2021, 11(1), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11010090
Received: 7 December 2020 / Revised: 26 December 2020 / Accepted: 28 December 2020 / Published: 6 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Soil Organic Carbon for Soil Health in Agroecosystems)
Soil organic carbon (SOC) is an essential component of soil health and a potential sink for greenhouse gases. SOC dynamics in a long-term field experiment with mineral and organic fertilization on loamy sand podzol in the Vladimir Region, Russia, was traced with the dynamic carbon model RothC from 1968 until the present. During this period, C stock increased by 21%, compared to the initial level, with the application of manure, at an average annual rate of 10 t·ha−1. The model was also used to forecast SOC changes up to 2090 for two contrasting RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 climatic scenarios. Up to 2090, steady growth of SOC stocks is expected in all compared treatments for both climate scenarios. In the scenarios, this growth rate was the highest up to 2040, decreased in the period 2040–2070, and increased again in the period 2070–2090 for RCP4.5. The highest annual gain was 21–27‰ under the RCP4.5 scenario and 16–21‰ under the RCP8.5 scenario in 2020–2040 in a 0–20 cm soil layer. Under the expected climate conditions in the 21st century, the C input will increase 1.3–1.5 times under the RCP4.5 scenario and decrease by 13–20% for the same period under the RCP 8.5 scenario. Modelling demonstrated potentially more favourable conditions for SOC stability in arable podzols than in Retisols in central Russia in the 21st century. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil organic carbon; soil health; long-term experiments; RothC model; climate change; “4 per 1000” initiative; podzols soil organic carbon; soil health; long-term experiments; RothC model; climate change; “4 per 1000” initiative; podzols
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ilichev, I.; Romanenkov, V.; Lukin, S.; Pavlova, V.; Siptits, S.; Krasilnikov, P. Arable Podzols Are a Substantial Carbon Sink under Current and Future Climates: Evidence from a Long-Term Experiment in the Vladimir Region, Russia. Agronomy 2021, 11, 90. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11010090

AMA Style

Ilichev I, Romanenkov V, Lukin S, Pavlova V, Siptits S, Krasilnikov P. Arable Podzols Are a Substantial Carbon Sink under Current and Future Climates: Evidence from a Long-Term Experiment in the Vladimir Region, Russia. Agronomy. 2021; 11(1):90. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11010090

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ilichev, Igor, Vladimir Romanenkov, Sergei Lukin, Vera Pavlova, Stanislav Siptits, and Pavel Krasilnikov. 2021. "Arable Podzols Are a Substantial Carbon Sink under Current and Future Climates: Evidence from a Long-Term Experiment in the Vladimir Region, Russia" Agronomy 11, no. 1: 90. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11010090

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