Next Article in Journal
Inoculation with Different Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria and Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Affects Grain Protein Content and Nodule Bacterial Communities of a Fava Bean Crop
Next Article in Special Issue
The Diversification and Intensification of Crop Rotations under No-Till Promote Earthworm Abundance and Biomass
Previous Article in Journal
Exploration of Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.), an Underutilized Crop, to Aid Global Food Security: Varietal Improvement, Genetic Diversity and Processing
Previous Article in Special Issue
Response of the Arthropod Community to Soil Characteristics and Management in the Franciacorta Viticultural Area (Lombardy, Italy)
Open AccessArticle

Management Intensification of Hay Meadows and Fruit Orchards Alters Soil Macro- Invertebrate Communities Differently

1
Institute for Alpine Environment, Eurac Research, Viale Druso 1, 39100 Bozen/Bolzano, Italy
2
Department of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25/Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(6), 767; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060767
Received: 17 April 2020 / Revised: 20 May 2020 / Accepted: 22 May 2020 / Published: 28 May 2020
Land-use changes and especially management intensification currently pose a major threat to biodiversity both on and beneath the soil surface. With a comparative approach, we investigated how management intensity in orchards and meadows influences soil macro-invertebrate communities in a North-Italian Alpine region. We compared soil fauna assemblies from traditional low-input sites with respective intensively managed ones. As expected, the taxonomical richness and diversity were lower in both intensive management types. Extensive management of both types revealed similar communities, while intensification led to substantial differences between management types. From these results, we conclude that intensification of agricultural practices severely alters the soil fauna community and biodiversity in general, however, the direction of these changes is governed by the management type. In our view, extensive management, traditional for mountain areas, favors soil fauna communities that have adapted over a long time and can thus be viewed as a sustainable reference condition for new production systems that consider the protection of soil diversity in order to conserve essential ecosystem functions. View Full-Text
Keywords: traditional management; soil biodiversity; sustainable agriculture; management intensity; South Tyrol; mountain agriculture traditional management; soil biodiversity; sustainable agriculture; management intensity; South Tyrol; mountain agriculture
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Guariento, E.; Colla, F.; Steinwandter, M.; Plunger, J.; Tappeiner, U.; Seeber, J. Management Intensification of Hay Meadows and Fruit Orchards Alters Soil Macro- Invertebrate Communities Differently. Agronomy 2020, 10, 767.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop