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Review

Non-Chemical Weed Management in Vegetables by Using Cover Crops: A Review

1
Department of Plant Protection, Agriculture Faculty, Ondokuz Mayis University, 55139 Samsun, Turkey
2
Department of Plant Production and Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Science and Technologies, Nigde Omer Halisdemir University, 51240 Nigde, Turkey
3
Department of Horticulture, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
4
Department of Plant Protection, Agriculture Faculty Siirt University, 56100 Siirt, Turkey
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(2), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10020257
Received: 4 December 2019 / Revised: 28 January 2020 / Accepted: 5 February 2020 / Published: 11 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecologically Sustainable Weed Management in Cropping Systems)
Vegetables are a substantial part of our lives and possess great commercial and nutritional value. Weeds not only decrease vegetable yield but also reduce their quality. Non-chemical weed control is important both for the organic production of vegetables and achieving ecologically sustainable weed management. Estimates have shown that the yield of vegetables may be decreased by 45%–95% in the case of weed–vegetable competition. Non-chemical weed control in vegetables is desired for several reasons. For example, there are greater chances of contamination of vegetables by herbicide residue compared to cereals or pulse crops. Non-chemical weed control in vegetables is also needed due to environmental pollution, the evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds and a strong desire for organic vegetable cultivation. Although there are several ways to control weeds without the use of herbicides, cover crops are an attractive choice because these have a number of additional benefits (such as soil and water conservation) along with the provision of satisfactory and sustainable weed control. Several cover crops are available that may provide excellent weed control in vegetable production systems. Cover crops such as rye, vetch, or Brassicaceae plants can suppress weeds in rotations, including vegetables crops such as tomato, cabbage, or pumpkin. Growers should also consider the negative effects of using cover crops for weed control, such as the negative allelopathic effects of some cover crop residues on the main vegetable crop. View Full-Text
Keywords: cover crops; weeds; vegetables; non-chemical weed control; allelopathy; physical weed control cover crops; weeds; vegetables; non-chemical weed control; allelopathy; physical weed control
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mennan, H.; Jabran, K.; Zandstra, B.H.; Pala, F. Non-Chemical Weed Management in Vegetables by Using Cover Crops: A Review. Agronomy 2020, 10, 257. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10020257

AMA Style

Mennan H, Jabran K, Zandstra BH, Pala F. Non-Chemical Weed Management in Vegetables by Using Cover Crops: A Review. Agronomy. 2020; 10(2):257. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10020257

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mennan, Husrev, Khawar Jabran, Bernard H. Zandstra, and Firat Pala. 2020. "Non-Chemical Weed Management in Vegetables by Using Cover Crops: A Review" Agronomy 10, no. 2: 257. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10020257

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