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Article

Application of Glass Fiber and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics in Face Guards

1
Department of Advanced Biomaterials, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan
2
Department of Sports Medicine/Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan
3
Department of Oral Biomaterials Development Engineering, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan
4
Department of Materials Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7‑3‑1 Hongo, Bunkyo‑ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2021, 13(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13010018
Received: 15 November 2020 / Revised: 20 December 2020 / Accepted: 21 December 2020 / Published: 23 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics)
Face guards (FGs) are protectors that allow for the rapid and safe return of athletes who are to play after sustaining traumatic facial injuries and orbital fractures. Current FGs require significant thickness to achieve sufficient shock absorption abilities. However, their weight and thickness render the FGs uncomfortable and reduce the field of vision of the athlete, thus hindering their performance. Therefore, thin and lightweight FGs are required. We fabricated FGs using commercial glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (GFRTP) and carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (CFRTP) resins to achieve these requirements and investigated their shock absorption abilities through impact testing. The results showed that an FG composed of CFRTP is thinner and lighter than a conventional FG and has sufficient shock absorption ability. The fabrication method of an FG comprising CFRTP is similar to the conventional method. FGs composed of commercial FRTPs exhibit adequate shock absorption abilities and are thinner and lower in weight as compared to conventional FGs. View Full-Text
Keywords: face guard; glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic; carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic; shock absorption face guard; glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic; carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic; shock absorption
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wada, T.; Churei, H.; Yokose, M.; Iwasaki, N.; Takahashi, H.; Uo, M. Application of Glass Fiber and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics in Face Guards. Polymers 2021, 13, 18. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13010018

AMA Style

Wada T, Churei H, Yokose M, Iwasaki N, Takahashi H, Uo M. Application of Glass Fiber and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics in Face Guards. Polymers. 2021; 13(1):18. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13010018

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wada, Takahiro, Hiroshi Churei, Mako Yokose, Naohiko Iwasaki, Hidekazu Takahashi, and Motohiro Uo. 2021. "Application of Glass Fiber and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics in Face Guards" Polymers 13, no. 1: 18. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13010018

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