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Article

Microstructural Contributions of Different Polyolefins to the Deformation Mechanisms of Their Binary Blends

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Centre for Polymer and Material Technologies (CPMT), Department of Materials, Textiles and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Technologiepark 130, B-9052 Zwijnaarde, Belgium
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Department of Green Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University—Campus Kortrijk, Graaf Karel de Goedelaan 5, 8500 Kortrijk, Belgium
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Sustainable Systems Engineering (STEN), Department of Green Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
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Laboratory for Chemical Technology (LCT), Department of Materials, Textiles and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Technologiepark 125, B-9052 Zwijnaarde, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Both authors contributed equally to this manuscript.
Polymers 2020, 12(5), 1171; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051171
Received: 15 April 2020 / Revised: 13 May 2020 / Accepted: 15 May 2020 / Published: 20 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Polymer Processing and Engineering)
The mixing of polymers, even structurally similar polyolefins, inevitably leads to blend systems with a phase-separated morphology. Fundamentally understanding the changes in mechanical properties and occurring deformation mechanisms of these immiscible polymer blends, is important with respect to potential mechanical recycling. This work focuses on the behavior of binary blends of linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP) under tensile deformation and their related changes in crystallinity and morphology. All of these polymers plastically deform by shear yielding. When unmixed, the high crystalline polyolefins HDPE and PP both exhibit a progressive necking phenomenon. LDPE initiates a local neck before material failure, while LLDPE is characterized by a uniform deformation as well as clear strain hardening. LLDPE/LDPE and LLDPE/PP combinations both exhibit a clear-cut matrix switchover. Polymer blends LLDPE/LDPE, LDPE/HDPE, and LDPE/PP show transition forms with features of composing materials. Combining PP in an HDPE matrix causes a radical switch to brittle behavior. View Full-Text
Keywords: immiscible polymer blends; polyolefins; deformation mechanisms; commodity plastics; mechanical recycling; structure–property relationships immiscible polymer blends; polyolefins; deformation mechanisms; commodity plastics; mechanical recycling; structure–property relationships
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MDPI and ACS Style

Van Belle, A.; Demets, R.; Mys, N.; Van Kets, K.; Dewulf, J.; Van Geem, K.; De Meester, S.; Ragaert, K. Microstructural Contributions of Different Polyolefins to the Deformation Mechanisms of Their Binary Blends. Polymers 2020, 12, 1171. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051171

AMA Style

Van Belle A, Demets R, Mys N, Van Kets K, Dewulf J, Van Geem K, De Meester S, Ragaert K. Microstructural Contributions of Different Polyolefins to the Deformation Mechanisms of Their Binary Blends. Polymers. 2020; 12(5):1171. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051171

Chicago/Turabian Style

Van Belle, Astrid, Ruben Demets, Nicolas Mys, Karen Van Kets, Jo Dewulf, Kevin Van Geem, Steven De Meester, and Kim Ragaert. 2020. "Microstructural Contributions of Different Polyolefins to the Deformation Mechanisms of Their Binary Blends" Polymers 12, no. 5: 1171. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051171

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