Next Article in Journal
3D Printing of Polymeric Multi-Layer Micro-Perforated Panels for Tunable Wideband Sound Absorption
Previous Article in Journal
Preparation and Characterization of UV-Curable Acrylic Membranes Embedding Natural Antioxidants
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Review on the Partial and Complete Dissolution and Fractionation of Wood and Lignocelluloses Using Imidazolium Ionic Liquids
Open AccessArticle

Larch Wood Residues Valorization through Extraction and Utilization of High Value-Added Products

1
Department of Forest Products Technology & Timber Constructions, Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl, Austria
2
Salzburg Center for Smart Materials, c/o Department of Chemistry and Physics of Materials, Paris Lodron University of Salzburg, Jakob-Haringer-Strasse 2A, 5020 Salzburg, Austria
3
Department of Chemistry and Physics of Materials, Paris Lodron University of Salzburg, Jakob-Haringer-Strasse 2A, 5020 Salzburg, Austria
4
Laboratory of Natural Materials Technology, Åbo Akademi University, Porthasgatan 3, 20500 Turku/Åbo, Finland
5
Department of Material Sciences and Process Engineering, BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Konrad Lorenz-Straße 24, 3340 Tulln, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2020, 12(2), 359; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12020359
Received: 29 November 2019 / Revised: 1 January 2020 / Accepted: 13 January 2020 / Published: 6 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based Polymers for Engineered Green Materials)
Many of current bio-based materials are not fully or partly used for material utilization, as the composition of their raw materials and/or possible applications are unknown. This study deals with the analysis of the wood extractives from three different tissue of larch wood: Sapwood mainly from outer part of the log, and sound knotwood as well as dead knotwood. The extractions were performed with an accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) using hexane and acetone/water. The obtained extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three various vibrational spectroscopy (FT-RAMAN, FT-IR and FT-NIR) methods reflect the information from the extracts to the chemical composition of the types of wood before the extraction processes. Multivariate data analysis of the spectra was used to obtain a better insight into possible classification methods. Taxifolin and kaempferol were found in larger amount in sound knotwood samples compared to larch wood with high percentage of sapwood and dead knotwood samples. While the extractions of dead knotwood samples yielded more larixol and resin acids than the other larch wood samples used. Based on the chemical composition, three lead compounds were defined for the classification of the different wood raw materials. The vibrational spectroscopy methods were applied to show their potential for a possible distinction of the three types of larch wood tissue. This new insight into the different larch wood extracts will help in the current efforts to use more environmentally friendly raw materials for innovative applications. The connection between the raw materials and extraction yields of the target values is important to transform the results from the laboratory to industry and consumer applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: GC-MS; kaempferol; knotwood; larixol; taxifolin; vibrational spectroscopy GC-MS; kaempferol; knotwood; larixol; taxifolin; vibrational spectroscopy
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Wagner, K.; Musso, M.; Kain, S.; Willför, S.; Petutschnigg, A.; Schnabel, T. Larch Wood Residues Valorization through Extraction and Utilization of High Value-Added Products. Polymers 2020, 12, 359.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop