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Polymers 2018, 10(5), 515; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym10050515

Plant Secondary Metabolite-Derived Polymers: A Potential Approach to Develop Antimicrobial Films

1
Electronics Materials Lab, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
2
Physics Department, College of Science, Ramadi, Anbar University, Ramadi 11, Iraq
3
School of Chemistry, Physics, Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 April 2018 / Revised: 27 April 2018 / Accepted: 2 May 2018 / Published: 10 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers from Renewable Resources)
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Abstract

The persistent issue of bacterial and fungal colonization of artificial implantable materials and the decreasing efficacy of conventional systemic antibiotics used to treat implant-associated infections has led to the development of a wide range of antifouling and antibacterial strategies. This article reviews one such strategy where inherently biologically active renewable resources, i.e., plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) and their naturally occurring combinations (i.e., essential oils) are used for surface functionalization and synthesis of polymer thin films. With a distinct mode of antibacterial activity, broad spectrum of action, and diversity of available chemistries, plant secondary metabolites present an attractive alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, their conversion from liquid to solid phase without a significant loss of activity is not trivial. Using selected examples, this article shows how plasma techniques provide a sufficiently flexible and chemically reactive environment to enable the synthesis of biologically-active polymer coatings from volatile renewable resources. View Full-Text
Keywords: volatile renewable resources; microbial infection; plant secondary metabolites; antimicrobial essential oils; biologically-active polymers; plasma-assisted technique volatile renewable resources; microbial infection; plant secondary metabolites; antimicrobial essential oils; biologically-active polymers; plasma-assisted technique
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Al-Jumaili, A.; Kumar, A.; Bazaka, K.; Jacob, M.V. Plant Secondary Metabolite-Derived Polymers: A Potential Approach to Develop Antimicrobial Films. Polymers 2018, 10, 515.

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