Next Article in Journal
Monolith Metal-Oxide-Supported Catalysts: Sorbent for Environmental Application
Previous Article in Journal
Immobilization of Ir(OH)3 Nanoparticles in Mesospaces of Al-SiO2 Nanoparticles Assembly to Enhance Stability for Photocatalytic Water Oxidation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Recent Advances in Enzyme-Nanostructure Biocatalysts with Enhanced Activity
Open AccessReview

Green Catalysts: Applied and Synthetic Photosynthesis

1
Graduate School of Genome Science and Technology, University of Tennessee at Knoxville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Knoxville, TN 37916, USA
2
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129, USA
3
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Bakersfield, Bakersfield, CA 93311, USA
4
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Tennessee at Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
5
Biochemistry, Cellular & Molecular Biology Department, University of Tennessee at Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37916, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
This contribution is dedicated to Ana and Tom Moore: Mentors, Colleagues, Friends, and Early Visionaries.
Catalysts 2020, 10(9), 1016; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10091016
Received: 8 August 2020 / Revised: 29 August 2020 / Accepted: 1 September 2020 / Published: 3 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State of the Art and Future Trends in Nanostructured Biocatalysis)
The biological process of photosynthesis was critical in catalyzing the oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere 2.5 billion years ago, changing the course of development of life on Earth. Recently, the fields of applied and synthetic photosynthesis have utilized the light-driven protein–pigment supercomplexes central to photosynthesis for the photocatalytic production of fuel and other various valuable products. The reaction center Photosystem I is of particular interest in applied photosynthesis due to its high stability post-purification, non-geopolitical limitation, and its ability to generate the greatest reducing power found in nature. These remarkable properties have been harnessed for the photocatalytic production of a number of valuable products in the applied photosynthesis research field. These primarily include photocurrents and molecular hydrogen as fuels. The use of artificial reaction centers to generate substrates and reducing equivalents to drive non-photoactive enzymes for valuable product generation has been a long-standing area of interest in the synthetic photosynthesis research field. In this review, we cover advances in these areas and further speculate synthetic and applied photosynthesis as photocatalysts for the generation of valuable products. View Full-Text
Keywords: photosynthesis; photoelectrochemical devices; biohybrid; synthetic biology; photochemistry; photoelectrochemistry; hydrogen evolution photosynthesis; photoelectrochemical devices; biohybrid; synthetic biology; photochemistry; photoelectrochemistry; hydrogen evolution
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Teodor, A.H.; Sherman, B.D.; Ison, Z.Y.; Ooi, E.-J.; Bergkamp, J.J.; Bruce, B.D. Green Catalysts: Applied and Synthetic Photosynthesis. Catalysts 2020, 10, 1016.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop