Next Article in Journal
Molecular Characterization of Astrocytoma Progression Towards Secondary Glioblastomas Utilizing Patient-Matched Tumor Pairs
Previous Article in Journal
Chemical, Physical and Biological Triggers of Evolutionary Conserved Bcl-xL-Mediated Apoptosis
Open AccessArticle

Association of Allostatic Load with All-Cause and Cancer Mortality by Race and Body Mass Index in the REGARDS Cohort

1
Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27701, USA
2
Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
3
Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA
4
Department of Medicine and University of Vermont Cancer Center, Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
5
Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention and Cardiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030; USA
6
Weill Cornell Medical College, Weill Cornell, New York City, NY 10065, USA
7
Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2020, 12(6), 1695; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061695
Received: 8 June 2020 / Revised: 18 June 2020 / Accepted: 20 June 2020 / Published: 26 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Molecular Basis of Cancer Health Disparities)
Among 29,701 Black and White participants aged 45 years and older in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Difference in Stroke (REGARDS) study, allostatic load (AL) was defined as the sum score of established baseline risk-associated biomarkers for which participants exceeded a set cutoff point. Cox proportional hazard regression was utilized to determine the association of AL score with all-cause and cancer-specific mortality, with analyses stratified by body-mass index, age group, and race. At baseline, Blacks had a higher AL score compared with Whites (Black mean AL score: 2.42, SD: 1.50; White mean AL score: 1.99, SD: 1.39; p < 0.001). Over the follow-up period, there were 4622 all-cause and 1237 cancer-specific deaths observed. Every unit increase in baseline AL score was associated with a 24% higher risk of all-cause (HR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.22, 1.27) and a 7% higher risk of cancer-specific mortality (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.12). The association of AL with overall- and cancer-specific mortality was similar among Blacks and Whites and across age-groups, however the risk of cancer-specific mortality was higher among normal BMI than overweight or obese participants. In conclusion, a higher baseline AL score was associated with increased risk of all-cause and cancer-specific mortality among both Black and White participants. Targeted interventions to patient groups with higher AL scores, regardless of race, may be beneficial as a strategy to reduce all-cause and cancer-specific mortality. View Full-Text
Keywords: allostatic load; mortality; racial disparities; obesity; biomarkers allostatic load; mortality; racial disparities; obesity; biomarkers
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Akinyemiju, T.; Wilson, L.E.; Deveaux, A.; Aslibekyan, S.; Cushman, M.; Gilchrist, S.; Safford, M.; Judd, S.; Howard, V. Association of Allostatic Load with All-Cause and Cancer Mortality by Race and Body Mass Index in the REGARDS Cohort. Cancers 2020, 12, 1695.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop