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Pancreatic Cancer Related Health Disparities: A Commentary

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Department of Family, Community and Health System Science, 1225 Center Drive, P. O. Box 100187, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
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Department of Biobehavioral Nursing Science, College of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
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Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee, FL 32301, USA
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Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
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Department Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
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Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee, FL 32301, USA
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Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
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Departments of Cancer Epidemiology and Gastroinestinal Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
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Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
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Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2018, 10(7), 235; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10070235
Received: 29 April 2018 / Revised: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 13 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
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PDF [1437 KB, uploaded 18 July 2018]
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Abstract

We summarize the risk factors that may significantly contribute to racial disparities in pancreatic cancer, which is now the third leading cause of cancer deaths and projected to be second around 2030 in 12 years. For decades, the incidence rate of pancreatic cancer among Blacks has been 30% to 70% higher than other racial groups in the United States and the 5-year survival rate is approximately 5%. Diabetes and obesity have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer and both are more common among Blacks. Smoking continues to be one of the most important risk factors for pancreatic cancer and smoking rates are higher among Blacks compared to other racial groups. The overall risk of pancreatic cancer due to changes in DNA is thought to be the same for most racial groups; however, DNA methylation levels have been observed to be significantly different between Blacks and Whites. This finding may underlie the racial disparities in pancreatic cancer. Identification and prevention of these factors may be effective strategies to reduce the high incidence and mortality rates for pancreatic cancer among Blacks. View Full-Text
Keywords: pancreatic cancer; racial disparities pancreatic cancer; racial disparities
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Scarton, L.; Yoon, S.; Oh, S.; Agyare, E.; Trevino, J.; Han, B.; Lee, E.; Setiawan, V.W.; Permuth, J.B.; Schmittgen, T.D.; Odedina, F.G.; Wilkie, D.J. Pancreatic Cancer Related Health Disparities: A Commentary. Cancers 2018, 10, 235.

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