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Article

Persistent Head and Neck Cancer Following First-Line Treatment

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Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
2
Department of Internal Medicine V, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
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Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2018, 10(11), 421; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10110421
Received: 10 October 2018 / Revised: 26 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 3 November 2018
Background: Following first-line treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC), persistent disease may require second-line treatment. Methods: All patients with HNC treated between 2008 and 2016 were included. Second-line treatment modalities and survival of patients were analyzed. Results: After first-line therapy, 175/741 patients had persistent disease. Of these, 112 were considered eligible for second-line treatment. Second-line treatment resulted in 50% complete response. Median overall survival of patients receiving second-line therapy was 24 (95% CI: 19 to 29) months; otherwise survival was 10 (9 to 11; p < 0.0001) months. Patients receiving second-line surgery had a median overall survival of 45 (28 to 62) months, patients receiving second-line radiotherapy had a median overall survival of 37 (0 to 79; p = 0.17) months, and patients receiving systemic therapy had a median overall survival of 13 (10 to 16; p < 0.001) months. Patients with persistent HNC in the neck had a better median survival (45 months; 16 to 74 months; p = 0.001) than patients with persistence at other sites. Conclusion: Early treatment response evaluation allows early initiation of second-line treatment and offers selected patients with persistent disease a realistic chance to achieve complete response after all. If possible, surgery or radiotherapy are preferable. View Full-Text
Keywords: persistent disease; salvage surgery; SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy); second-line treatment; neck dissection; complete response; best supportive care persistent disease; salvage surgery; SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy); second-line treatment; neck dissection; complete response; best supportive care
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MDPI and ACS Style

Steinbichler, T.B.; Lichtenecker, M.; Anegg, M.; Dejaco, D.; Kofler, B.; Schartinger, V.H.; Kasseroler, M.-T.; Forthuber, B.; Posch, A.; Riechelmann, H. Persistent Head and Neck Cancer Following First-Line Treatment. Cancers 2018, 10, 421. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10110421

AMA Style

Steinbichler TB, Lichtenecker M, Anegg M, Dejaco D, Kofler B, Schartinger VH, Kasseroler M-T, Forthuber B, Posch A, Riechelmann H. Persistent Head and Neck Cancer Following First-Line Treatment. Cancers. 2018; 10(11):421. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10110421

Chicago/Turabian Style

Steinbichler, Teresa Bernadette, Madeleine Lichtenecker, Maria Anegg, Daniel Dejaco, Barbara Kofler, Volker Hans Schartinger, Maria-Therese Kasseroler, Britta Forthuber, Andrea Posch, and Herbert Riechelmann. 2018. "Persistent Head and Neck Cancer Following First-Line Treatment" Cancers 10, no. 11: 421. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10110421

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