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Article

Applicability of Artificial Vascularized Liver Tissue to Proteomic Analysis

1
Cellular and Molecular Biotechnology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 5-41, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565, Japan
2
Advanced Photonics and Biosensing Open Innovation Laboratory, AIST, Central 5-41, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kristina Haase
Micromachines 2021, 12(4), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12040418
Received: 24 February 2021 / Revised: 19 March 2021 / Accepted: 21 March 2021 / Published: 11 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidics and Bioprinting Technologies for 3D Vascularized Tissue)
Artificial vascularized tubular liver tissue has perfusable blood vessels that allow fluid access to the tissue interior, enabling the injection of drugs and collection of metabolites, which are valuable for drug discovery. It is amenable to standard evaluation methods, such as paraffin-embedded sectioning, qPCR, and RNA sequencing, which makes it easy to implement into existing research processes. However, the application of tissues vascularized by the self-assembly of cells, (including tubular liver tissue, has not yet been tested in comprehensive proteomic analysis relevant for drug discovery. Here, we established a method to efficiently separate cells from the tubular liver tissue by adding a pipetting step during collagenase treatment. By using this method, we succeeded in obtaining a sufficient number of cells for the proteomic analysis. In addition, to validate this approach, we compared the cells separated from the tissue with those grown in 2D culture, focusing on the proteins related to drug metabolism. We found that the levels of proteins involved in metabolic phases II and III were slightly higher in the tubular liver tissue than those in the 2D cell culture. Taken together, our suggested method demonstrates the applicability of tubular liver tissue to the proteomic analysis in drug assays. View Full-Text
Keywords: blood vessels; hepatocellular carcinoma; liver; organoids; proteome blood vessels; hepatocellular carcinoma; liver; organoids; proteome
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mori, N.; Kida, Y.S. Applicability of Artificial Vascularized Liver Tissue to Proteomic Analysis. Micromachines 2021, 12, 418. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12040418

AMA Style

Mori N, Kida YS. Applicability of Artificial Vascularized Liver Tissue to Proteomic Analysis. Micromachines. 2021; 12(4):418. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12040418

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mori, Nobuhito, and Yasuyuki S. Kida. 2021. "Applicability of Artificial Vascularized Liver Tissue to Proteomic Analysis" Micromachines 12, no. 4: 418. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12040418

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