Next Article in Journal
Computational Characterization of the Dish-In-A-Dish, A High Yield Culture Platform for Endothelial Shear Stress Studies on the Orbital Shaker
Previous Article in Journal
Implementation of a Single Emulsion Mask for Three-Dimensional (3D) Microstructure Fabrication of Micromixers Using the Grayscale Photolithography Technique
Previous Article in Special Issue
Development of a Disposable Single-Nozzle Printhead for 3D Bioprinting of Continuous Multi-Material Constructs
Open AccessArticle

3D Printed Biomodels for Flow Visualization in Stenotic Vessels: An Experimental and Numerical Study

1
ALGORITMI Center (CAlg), University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
2
Mechanical Engineering and Resource Sustainability Center (MEtRiCS), University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
3
BIOFABICS, Rua Alfredo Allen 455, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal
4
Transport Phenomena Research Center, Department of Chemical Engineering (CEFT), Engineering Faculty, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Shared senior authorship.
Micromachines 2020, 11(6), 549; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11060549
Received: 24 April 2020 / Revised: 17 May 2020 / Accepted: 25 May 2020 / Published: 29 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofabrication and 3D Bioprinting)
Atherosclerosis is one of the most serious and common forms of cardiovascular disease and a major cause of death and disability worldwide. It is a multifactorial and complex disease that promoted several hemodynamic studies. Although in vivo studies more accurately represent the physiological conditions, in vitro experiments more reliably control several physiological variables and most adequately validate numerical flow studies. Here, a hemodynamic study in idealized stenotic and healthy coronary arteries is presented by applying both numerical and in vitro approaches through computational fluid dynamics simulations and a high-speed video microscopy technique, respectively. By means of stereolithography 3D printing technology, biomodels with three different resolutions were used to perform experimental flow studies. The results showed that the biomodel printed with a resolution of 50 μm was able to most accurately visualize flow due to its lowest roughness values (Ra = 1.8 μm). The flow experimental results showed a qualitatively good agreement with the blood flow numerical data, providing a clear observation of recirculation regions when the diameter reduction reached 60%. View Full-Text
Keywords: atherosclerosis; in vitro biomodels; CFD; 3D printing; stereolithography; blood flow; blood analogues; hemodynamics atherosclerosis; in vitro biomodels; CFD; 3D printing; stereolithography; blood flow; blood analogues; hemodynamics
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Carvalho, V.; Rodrigues, N.; Ribeiro, R.; Costa, P.F.; Lima, R.A.; F.C.F. Teixeira, S. 3D Printed Biomodels for Flow Visualization in Stenotic Vessels: An Experimental and Numerical Study. Micromachines 2020, 11, 549.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop