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Open AccessArticle

The Influence of Electron Beam Sterilization on In Vivo Degradation of β-TCP/PCL of Different Composite Ratios for Bone Tissue Engineering

1
Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Gwanju 61186, Korea
2
Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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Surgical Bioengineering Laboratory, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of California–Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
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Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California–Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
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Institute for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Shriners Hospitals for Children–Northern California, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
7
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These individuals are co-first authors.
Micromachines 2020, 11(3), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11030273
Received: 13 February 2020 / Revised: 2 March 2020 / Accepted: 4 March 2020 / Published: 6 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine)
We evaluated the effect of electron beam (E-beam) sterilization (25 kGy, ISO 11137) on the degradation of β-tricalcium phosphate/polycaprolactone (β-TCP/PCL) composite filaments of various ratios (0:100, 20:80, 40:60, and 60:40 TCP:PCL by mass) in a rat subcutaneous model for 24 weeks. Volumes of the samples before implantation and after explantation were measured using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The filament volume changes before sacrifice were also measured using a live micro-CT. In our micro-CT analyses, there was no significant difference in volume change between the E-beam treated groups and non-E-beam treated groups of the same β-TCP to PCL ratios, except for the 0% β-TCP group. However, the average volume reduction differences between the E-beam and non-E-beam groups in the same-ratio samples were 0.76% (0% TCP), 3.30% (20% TCP), 4.65% (40% TCP), and 3.67% (60% TCP). The E-beam samples generally had more volume reduction in all experimental groups. Therefore, E-beam treatment may accelerate degradation. In our live micro-CT analyses, most volume reduction arose in the first four weeks after implantation and slowed between 4 and 20 weeks in all groups. E-beam groups showed greater volume reduction at every time point, which is consistent with the results by micro-CT analysis. Histology results suggest the biocompatibility of TCP/PCL composite filaments. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D printing; β-tricalcium phosphate/polycaprolactone (β-TCP/PCL) composite; bone tissue engineering; electron beam sterilization 3D printing; β-tricalcium phosphate/polycaprolactone (β-TCP/PCL) composite; bone tissue engineering; electron beam sterilization
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Kang, J.-H.; Kaneda, J.; Jang, J.-G.; Sakthiabirami, K.; Lui, E.; Kim, C.; Wang, A.; Park, S.-W.; Yang, Y.P. The Influence of Electron Beam Sterilization on In Vivo Degradation of β-TCP/PCL of Different Composite Ratios for Bone Tissue Engineering. Micromachines 2020, 11, 273.

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