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Open AccessOpinion

How Safe Is Safe for Marine Toxins Monitoring?

1
Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad Veterinaria, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 27002 Lugo, Spain
2
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago, 27002 Lugo, Spain
3
Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad Veterinaria, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 27002 Lugo, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jose M. Eirin-Lopez
Toxins 2016, 8(7), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins8070208
Received: 22 April 2016 / Revised: 27 June 2016 / Accepted: 1 July 2016 / Published: 6 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Collection Marine and Freshwater Toxins)
Current regulation for marine toxins requires a monitoring method based on mass spectrometric analysis. This method is pre-targeted, hence after searching for pre-assigned masses, it identifies those compounds that were pre-defined with available calibrants. Therefore, the scope for detecting novel toxins which are not included in the monitoring protocol are very limited. In addition to this, there is a poor comprehension of the toxicity of some marine toxin groups. Also, the validity of the current approach is questioned by the lack of sufficient calibrants, and by the insufficient coverage by current legislation of the toxins reported to be present in shellfish. As an example, tetrodotoxin, palytoxin analogs, or cyclic imines are mentioned as indicators of gaps in the system that require a solid comprehension to assure consumers are protected. View Full-Text
Keywords: food safety; toxicity equivalency factor; mass spectrometry; monitoring; marine toxin food safety; toxicity equivalency factor; mass spectrometry; monitoring; marine toxin
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MDPI and ACS Style

Botana, L.M.; Alfonso, A.; Rodríguez, I.; Botana, A.M.; Louzao, M.D.C.; Vieytes, M.R. How Safe Is Safe for Marine Toxins Monitoring? Toxins 2016, 8, 208.

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