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Open AccessArticle

Use of a Mobile Application for Self-Monitoring Dietary Intake: Feasibility Test and an Intervention Study

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul 04310, Korea
2
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
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Department of Computer Science, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul 04310, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2017, 9(7), 748; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9070748
Received: 5 May 2017 / Revised: 5 July 2017 / Accepted: 7 July 2017 / Published: 13 July 2017
Given the increasing social and economic burden of chronic disease and the need for efficient approaches to prevent and treat chronic disease, emphasis on the use of information and communication technology (ICT)-based health care has emerged. We aimed to test the feasibility of a mobile application, Diet-A, and examine whether Diet-A could be used to monitor dietary intake among adolescents. In a three-month pre–post intervention study, 9 male and 24 female high school students aged 16–18 years consented and participated in this study. Participants were instructed to record all foods and beverages consumed using voice or text mode input. Nutrient intake was measured using 24-h recalls pre- and post-intervention. We compared nutrient intake data assessed by Diet-A application with those assessed by 24-h recalls. Participants tended to underreport intakes of nutrients compared to those assessed by two 24-h recalls. There were significant decreases in sodium (p = 0.04) and calcium (p = 0.03) intake between pre- and post-intervention. Of participants who completed questionnaires of feasibility (n = 24), 61.9% reported that they were satisfied using the application to monitor their food intake, and 47.7% liked getting personal information about their dietary intake from the application. However, more than 70% of participants answered that it was burdensome to use the application or that they had trouble remembering to record their food intake. The mobile application Diet-A offers the opportunity to monitor dietary intake through real-time feedback. However, use of Diet-A may not provide accurate information on the food intake of adolescents, partly because of the recording burden. View Full-Text
Keywords: mobile application; mobile health care; dietary assessment; feasibility; pre–post intervention mobile application; mobile health care; dietary assessment; feasibility; pre–post intervention
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Lee, J.-E.; Song, S.; Ahn, J.S.; Kim, Y.; Lee, J.E. Use of a Mobile Application for Self-Monitoring Dietary Intake: Feasibility Test and an Intervention Study. Nutrients 2017, 9, 748.

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