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Nutrition Society of New Zealand Annual Conference Held in Christchurch, New Zealand, 8–9 December 2016
Open AccessArticle

Sport Nutrition Knowledge, Behaviors and Beliefs of High School Soccer Players

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School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 98331, USA
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Family and Community Health, School of Biological and Population Health Science, College of Public Health and Human Sciences Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 98331, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2017, 9(4), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9040350
Received: 10 February 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2017 / Accepted: 23 March 2017 / Published: 1 April 2017
For adolescent athletes (14–18 years), data on sport nutrition knowledge, behaviors and beliefs are limited, especially based on sex, race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. High school soccer players (n = 535; 55% female; 51% White, 41% Latino; 41% National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participants (80% Latino)) completed two questionnaires (demographic/health history and sport nutrition). The sport nutrition knowledge score was 45.6% with higher scores in NSLP-Whites vs. NSLP-Latinos (p < 0.01). Supplement knowledge differed by sex (16% lower in females; p = 0.047) and race/ethnicity (33% lower in Latinos; p < 0.001). Breakfast consumption was 57%; females ate breakfast less (50%) than males (60%; p < 0.001); NSLP-participants ate breakfast less (47%) than non-NSLP (62%; p < 0.001). Supplement use was 46%, with Latinos using more supplements than Whites do (p = 0.016). Overall, 30% used protein shakes, with females using less than males (p = 0.02), while use was twice as likely in Latino vs. White (p = 0.03). Overall, 45% reported their nutrient requirements were different from non-athlete peers. Latinos were less likely (p = 0.03) to report that their diet met nutritional requirements, but more than twice as likely to report that nutritional supplements were necessary for training (p < 0.001). Adolescent athletes, especially females and Latinos, would benefit from sport nutrition education that enhances food selection skills for health and sport performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: Latino; free or reduced lunch; supplement use; low-income; National School Lunch Program; adolescent athletes; diet behaviors Latino; free or reduced lunch; supplement use; low-income; National School Lunch Program; adolescent athletes; diet behaviors
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Manore, M.M.; Patton-Lopez, M.M.; Meng, Y.; Wong, S.S. Sport Nutrition Knowledge, Behaviors and Beliefs of High School Soccer Players. Nutrients 2017, 9, 350.

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