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Article

Association of Vitamin E Levels with Metabolic Syndrome, and MRI-Derived Body Fat Volumes and Liver Fat Content

1
Institute of Epidemiology, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany
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Biobank PopGen, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany
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Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Cologne, 50937 Cologne, Germany
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Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany
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Department of Neurology, University of Ulm, 89081 Ulm, Germany
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Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Bonn, 53113 Bonn, Germany
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Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, 24118 Kiel, Germany
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Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Center (DDZ) at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2017, 9(10), 1143; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9101143
Received: 21 July 2017 / Revised: 2 October 2017 / Accepted: 11 October 2017 / Published: 18 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Health and Disease)
We aimed to relate circulating α- and γ-tocopherol levels to a broad spectrum of adiposityrelated traits in a cross-sectional Northern German study. Anthropometric measures were obtained, and adipose tissue volumes and liver fat were quantified by magnetic resonance imaging in 641 individuals (mean age 61 years; 40.6% women). Concentrations of α- and γ-tocopherol were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Multivariable-adjusted linear and logistic regression were used to assess associations of circulating α- and γ-tocopherol/cholesterol ratio levels with visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), liver signal intensity (LSI), fatty liver disease (FLD), metabolic syndrome (MetS), and its individual components. The α- tocopherol/cholesterol ratio was positively associated with VAT (β scaled by interquartile range (IQR): 0.036; 95%Confidence Interval (CI): 0.0003; 0.071) and MetS (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.83; 95% CI: 1.21–2.76 for 3rd vs. 1st tertile), and the γ-tocopherol/cholesterol ratio was positively associated with VAT (β scaled by IQR: 0.066; 95% CI: 0.027; 0.104), SAT (β scaled by IQR: 0.048; 95% CI: 0.010; 0.087) and MetS (OR: 1.87; 95% CI: 1.23–2.84 for 3rd vs. 1st tertile). α- and γ-tocopherol levels were positively associated with high triglycerides and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (all Ptrend < 0.05). No association of α- and γ-tocopherol/cholesterol ratio with LSI/FLD was observed. Circulating vitamin E levels displayed strong associations with VAT and MetS. These observations lay the ground for further investigation in longitudinal studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin E; α- and γ-tocopherol; metabolic syndrome; body fat volumes; liver fat content vitamin E; α- and γ-tocopherol; metabolic syndrome; body fat volumes; liver fat content
MDPI and ACS Style

Waniek, S.; Di Giuseppe, R.; Plachta-Danielzik, S.; Ratjen, I.; Jacobs, G.; Koch, M.; Borggrefe, J.; Both, M.; Müller, H.-P.; Kassubek, J.; Nöthlings, U.; Esatbeyoglu, T.; Schlesinger, S.; Rimbach, G.; Lieb, W. Association of Vitamin E Levels with Metabolic Syndrome, and MRI-Derived Body Fat Volumes and Liver Fat Content. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1143. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9101143

AMA Style

Waniek S, Di Giuseppe R, Plachta-Danielzik S, Ratjen I, Jacobs G, Koch M, Borggrefe J, Both M, Müller H-P, Kassubek J, Nöthlings U, Esatbeyoglu T, Schlesinger S, Rimbach G, Lieb W. Association of Vitamin E Levels with Metabolic Syndrome, and MRI-Derived Body Fat Volumes and Liver Fat Content. Nutrients. 2017; 9(10):1143. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9101143

Chicago/Turabian Style

Waniek, Sabina, Romina Di Giuseppe, Sandra Plachta-Danielzik, Ilka Ratjen, Gunnar Jacobs, Manja Koch, Jan Borggrefe, Marcus Both, Hans-Peter Müller, Jan Kassubek, Ute Nöthlings, Tuba Esatbeyoglu, Sabrina Schlesinger, Gerald Rimbach, and Wolfgang Lieb. 2017. "Association of Vitamin E Levels with Metabolic Syndrome, and MRI-Derived Body Fat Volumes and Liver Fat Content" Nutrients 9, no. 10: 1143. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9101143

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