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Protecting Skeletal Muscle with Protein and Amino Acid during Periods of Disuse

1
Center for Rehabilitation and Physical Activity and Nutrition (CeRPAN), University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
2
Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
3
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong 3125, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2016, 8(7), 404; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8070404
Received: 25 May 2016 / Revised: 16 June 2016 / Accepted: 23 June 2016 / Published: 1 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Protein, Exercise and Muscle Health in an Ageing Population)
Habitual sedentary behavior increases risk of chronic disease, hospitalization and poor quality of life. Short-term bed rest or disuse accelerates the loss of muscle mass, function, and glucose tolerance. Optimizing nutritional practices and protein intake may reduce the consequences of disuse by preserving metabolic homeostasis and muscle mass and function. Most modes of physical inactivity have the potential to negatively impact the health of older adults more than their younger counterparts. Mechanistically, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis are negatively affected by disuse. This contributes to reduced muscle quality and is accompanied by impaired glucose regulation. Simply encouraging increased protein and/or energy consumption is a well-intentioned, but often impractical strategy to protect muscle health. Emerging evidence suggests that leucine supplemented meals may partially and temporarily protect skeletal muscle during disuse by preserving anabolism and mitigating reductions in mass, function and metabolic homeostasis. View Full-Text
Keywords: leucine; bed rest; muscle health; inactivity; muscle protein synthesis; diet leucine; bed rest; muscle health; inactivity; muscle protein synthesis; diet
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Galvan, E.; Arentson-Lantz, E.; Lamon, S.; Paddon-Jones, D. Protecting Skeletal Muscle with Protein and Amino Acid during Periods of Disuse. Nutrients 2016, 8, 404.

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