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NO-Rich Diet for Lifestyle-Related Diseases

Division of Pathophysiology, Department of Clinical Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Josai University, Saitama 350-0295, Japan
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Nutrients 2015, 7(6), 4911-4937; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7064911
Received: 2 April 2015 / Revised: 8 June 2015 / Accepted: 9 June 2015 / Published: 17 June 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Metabolic Dysfunction)
Decreased nitric oxide (NO) availability due to obesity and endothelial dysfunction might be causally related to the development of lifestyle-related diseases such as insulin resistance, ischemic heart disease, and hypertension. In such situations, instead of impaired NO synthase (NOS)-dependent NO generation, the entero-salivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway might serve as a backup system for NO generation by transmitting NO activities in the various molecular forms including NO and protein S-nitrosothiols. Recently accumulated evidence has demonstrated that dietary intake of fruits and vegetables rich in nitrate/nitrite is an inexpensive and easily-practicable way to prevent insulin resistance and vascular endothelial dysfunction by increasing the NO availability; a NO-rich diet may also prevent other lifestyle-related diseases, including osteoporosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cancer. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge of NO generation through the entero-salivary pathway and discusses its safety and preventive effects on lifestyle-related diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: lifestyle-related disease; nitric oxide (NO); nitrate; nitrite; insulin resistance; ischemia/reperfusion injury; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); osteoporosis; cancer lifestyle-related disease; nitric oxide (NO); nitrate; nitrite; insulin resistance; ischemia/reperfusion injury; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); osteoporosis; cancer
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Kobayashi, J.; Ohtake, K.; Uchida, H. NO-Rich Diet for Lifestyle-Related Diseases. Nutrients 2015, 7, 4911-4937.

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