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Open AccessArticle

Long-Term Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid Feeding on Lipid Composition and Brain Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Expression in Rats

1
Department of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2, Canada
2
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada
3
Centre for Aging and Associated Diseases, Zewail City for Science and Technology, Cairo, 12588, Egypt
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2015, 7(10), 8802-8817; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7105433
Received: 15 August 2015 / Revised: 30 September 2015 / Accepted: 14 October 2015 / Published: 22 October 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DHA for Optimal Health)
Arachidonic (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) brain accretion is essential for brain development. The impact of DHA-rich maternal diets on offspring brain fatty acid composition has previously been studied up to the weanling stage; however, there has been no follow-up at later stages. Here, we examine the impact of DHA-rich maternal and weaning diets on brain fatty acid composition at weaning and three weeks post-weaning. We report that DHA supplementation during lactation maintains high DHA levels in the brains of pups even when they are fed a DHA-deficient diet for three weeks after weaning. We show that boosting dietary DHA levels for three weeks after weaning compensates for a maternal DHA-deficient diet during lactation. Finally, our data indicate that brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7), a marker of neural stem cells, is down-regulated in the brains of six-week pups with a high DHA:AA ratio. We propose that elevated levels of DHA in developing brain accelerate brain maturation relative to DHA-deficient brains. View Full-Text
Keywords: arachidonic acid; brain development; brain lipids; diet and dietary lipids; fatty acid/binding protein arachidonic acid; brain development; brain lipids; diet and dietary lipids; fatty acid/binding protein
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Elsherbiny, M.E.; Goruk, S.; Monckton, E.A.; Richard, C.; Brun, M.; Emara, M.; Field, C.J.; Godbout, R. Long-Term Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid Feeding on Lipid Composition and Brain Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Expression in Rats. Nutrients 2015, 7, 8802-8817.

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