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Dietary Regulation of Histone Acetylases and Deacetylases for the Prevention of Metabolic Diseases

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, 216 Advanced Technology Laboratory Building, 1392 Storrs Road, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
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Nutrients 2012, 4(12), 1868-1886; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu4121868
Received: 1 October 2012 / Revised: 12 November 2012 / Accepted: 22 November 2012 / Published: 28 November 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics)
Age-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer involve epigenetic modifications, where accumulation of minute changes in the epigenome over time leads to disease manifestation. Epigenetic changes are influenced by life style and diets. This represents an avenue whereby dietary components could accelerate or prevent age-related diseases through their effects on epigenetic modifications. Histone acetylation is an epigenetic modification that is regulated through the opposing action of histone acetylases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs). These two families of enzymes play critical roles in metabolic processes and their dysregulation is associated with pathogenesis of several diseases. Dietary components, such as butyrate, sulforaphane, and curcumin, have been shown to affect HAT and HDAC activity, and their health benefits are attributed, at least in part, to epigenetic modifications. Given the decades that it takes to accumulate epigenetic changes, it is unlikely that pharmaceuticals could undo epigenetic changes without side effects. Therefore, long term consumption of dietary components that can alter the epigenome could be an attractive means of disease prevention. The goal of this review is to highlight the roles of diets and food components in epigenetic modifications through the regulation of HATs and HDACs for disease prevention. View Full-Text
Keywords: high-fat; HDAC; HAT; sulforpahane; curcumin; butyrate; epigenetics high-fat; HDAC; HAT; sulforpahane; curcumin; butyrate; epigenetics
MDPI and ACS Style

Pham, T.X.; Lee, J. Dietary Regulation of Histone Acetylases and Deacetylases for the Prevention of Metabolic Diseases. Nutrients 2012, 4, 1868-1886.

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